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Moose Z1100 and DSL

Discussion in 'Security Alarms' started by [email protected], Nov 5, 2008.

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  1. Guest

    Hi, I have a Moose Z1100 that I installed about 20 years ago. I
    recently installed DSL service on the phone line and now have problems
    with the panel. The panel dials out to the central station, but the
    station never receives any alarm codes. I had a tech come out from the
    monitoring company to check thinks out. He claims that the phone lines
    are OK, but the panel can no longer link to the station, handshake and
    send the alarm codes. He was able to link to the station with his
    equipment and claims this is a problem with older Moose systems on DSL
    lines.

    The phone company installed a DSL filter/splitter upstream of the RJ31
    jack that the panel connects to.

    Is this correct that some Moose systems will not work correctly on DSL
    lines? Is there something that can be done in the panel or from the
    phone company to make this panel work? The monitoring company of
    course wants to sell me a new panel and keypads. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Bob

    Bob Guest

    The moose is loose!!!!!Palin 2012
     
  3. Bob Worthy

    Bob Worthy Guest

    Shouldn't be a problem if the proper DSL filter is used. The phone company,
    which I assume is your DSL provider, does not have or supply the proper
    filter. required by alarm systems. Their filters are for your telephones,
    fax machines, etc. Not your alarm system. In fact, in the literature that
    comes with the DSL setup, usually alerts the consumer to contact the alarm
    company. Do you know if the alarm panel was communicating with the central
    station just recently and prior to the DSL installation? There are different
    formats in which a panel can use to communicate. Some of the available
    communication formats in the Moose where pretty slow if they were chosen by
    the original installer. I don't know if that would cause a different problem
    when DSL is present, filter or no filter. Maybe someone else here can shed
    some light on that aspect.
     
  4. Norm Mugford

    Norm Mugford Guest

    You're paying a professional to monitor your system.
    Why not take your professional alarm contractors
    recomendation that you should replace the panel.

    It would be my opinion, that since that professional
    is most likely licensed and has many years of experience
    to support his recomendations, you should replace the
    system.

    Think of it this way.........

    The car you drive today has many more features to protect
    you than the car you drove twenty years ago. Lets just say
    one feature would be the "airbag". Using that point,
    the alarm systems of today have many more features to
    protect you. Let's say one feature would be a dramatic
    difference in communication with your monitoring company.
    Twenty years ago, phone lines used rotary dial (like your
    Moose Z1100) now everything is touch tone. You will get
    much faster responce from your monitoring company and
    remember seconds count when you're being held up or your
    house is on fire........

    Take it from a professional, listen to your alarm company
    and "upgrade" your panel. It would be the best thing you
    could do for your family and how much are they worth?

    Norm Mugford
     
  5. alarman

    alarman Guest

    http://www.excelsus-tech.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=products.Category&id=6
    --
    js

    A government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the
    support of Paul. ----George Bernard Shaw

    A government big enough to give you everything you want, is strong
    enough to take everything you have.

    - Thomas Jefferson
     
  6. Guest

    I installed a Excelsus DSL filter. The panel will still not complete
    the handshake to the monitoring station. Any other suggestions?
     
  7. If you can change the format the Z1100 is using try one with much different
    tones.
    ie... 1800hz 10 pps 1400hz
    We have several Z1100 still working on DSL with no problems
    however we did notice an improvement in completion speed to the CC if the
    tones were
    in a lower frequency and the pulse was slower..
    and if your problem is dial in connection try putting a pause right before
    the telephone number in the programing.
     
  8. Guest

    Hi, I tried the different formats the Z1100 supports (4 different ones
    I believe). Same results. I am interested in trying the pause in the
    phone number. What value shold be used in the program memory before
    the phone number for a pause?
     
  9. my list of program values says to place a 13 ahead of the telephone
    number
    that's to give a 3 second wait, it's possible to add other 13's to extend
    that time further..
    or you can use a 14 which will give a 10 second wait.

    ie.. if you had to dial a 9 for an outside line you might add the 13/14
    after the 9 to give time for some older switches to assign a good outbound
    line.
    also if your system uses a ground start for an outside line the delay
    would be helpful.

    I've noticed some DSL service around here has about a 10 second beeping
    before the dial tone comes on.
    the delay would be helpful with that problem as well..

    If you have a noisey line you might switch to pulse instead of tone and
    then add the delay..

    BoL on finding the right combo
     
  10. I'd heard that Able1, but the customer swears they don't have any form of
    remote mail service..
    and ATT backs them up. Now someone isn't up to speed on their features,
    I'm sure..

    I do know that we had a pharmacy which switched over to DSL from cable and
    we had to add the delays to get it to work.
    It was a FBII not a Moose but I'd assume the practice would be the same..
    Best we could figure the auto dialer of the panel was hitting so fast the
    telecom was missing the first digit..
    (we added a 13 second delay)
    Oh well thats the real world not the engineers vision.. (LOL)
     
  11. IP Alarms

    IP Alarms Guest

    If you are not locked into a monitoring contract - go out and get
    yourself a Linksys PAP2T or SPA3102 from your nearest electronics
    retailer, plug an RJ11 cable direct from your panel modem to the
    Linksys, plug the Linksys into your router, get in touch with me and I
    will provide you with the contact details of a Monitoring Center who
    will give you with instructions for setting up your adapter and will
    take the signal over the Internet ;-)

    The PAP2T is around $50 and is "IP Only". The SPA3102 is around $80
    and it allows you to add a cellular backup unit to send the signal if
    IP fails.
     
  12. mpm

    mpm Guest

    How do your phones sound?
    Do callers hear your voice as "tinny"? How do their voices sound to
    you?
    Acceptable? Or not? Especially as compared to how it was before
    DSL.

    A couple ideas, guesses...
    You could put a DSL filter right at the panel.
    This should provide the best filtering you are likely to get, and you
    won't have a bunch of cable loss in front of the filter (currently
    upstream of the RJ31X).

    Another thought (unlikely) is that the frequency response of your tip
    & ring connection (normal phone side of the filter) isn't as good as
    your old phone service was. (i.e. level and/or flatness) If this is
    the case, selecting another dialer transmission format should solve
    the problem. And competent phone technician can tell you the response
    of the line. You'll want to select a format that is the best "fit"
    within whatever response you have.

    That said, all of the Z1100 (and competitor) formats were originally
    designed for standard telephone response curves, and therefore should
    work fine with DSL regardless. But after 20 years, the components in
    the dialer section of your panel may have drifted some, esp. if it
    uses electrolytic capacitors in that particular circuit. But all is
    not lost. Try the slowest, mid-range frequency tones you think you
    can live with (from a speed perspective), and give that a try. In
    other words, try to stay away from the "edges" of the actual response
    curve. Good luck.

    -mpm
     
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