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Momentary Knob?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by 1eyepete, Feb 11, 2013.

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  1. 1eyepete

    1eyepete

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    Feb 11, 2013
    Total beginner here. Forgive me if I use the incorrect terms.
    I am looking for the name a part (or even if it exists). What I want is a turn knob that every time it clicks will make a momentary connection. Preferably double pole? (2 different circuits?)
    (Back ground; I have rewired a PC keyboard and want the turn knob to emulate 2 different keystrokes, i.e. two circuits.)

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. GreenGiant

    GreenGiant

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    Feb 9, 2012
    do you want it to rotate all the way around multiple times or just have 2 positions that you will switch back and forth?

    The latter of which can be found here. Please note that this is just the first item on the list when searching "rotary momentary switch" and others do exist.

    Though I'm guessing you meant the former which with a little digging does not seem to exist, you could however take a multiposition switch and with some extra circuitry turn it into momentary button presses, or you could do it with a microprocessor
     
  3. 1eyepete

    1eyepete

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    Feb 11, 2013
    You are correct, ultimately I would like to have a dial that will turn endlessly.
    Thank you for your reply.
     
  4. john dougherty

    john dougherty

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    Feb 11, 2013
    yaxley switch

    I think it could be a yaxley switch and was used many years ago
     
  5. 1eyepete

    1eyepete

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    Feb 11, 2013
    Thanks, this is definitely looking like the correct direction. I will have to do some more searching.
     
  6. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    What about a wheel out of a computer mouse? It will doubtless need som extra circuitry.
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,496
    2,837
    Jan 21, 2010
    You could look into a rotary encoder. One that has quadrature outputs will turn 2 connections on and off multiple times as the shaft is turned.

    These are designed for low current and the on times overlap like this:

    1 off on on off off on on off off
    2 off off on on off off on on off

    Each separate column represents a "click" of the switch as it turns. There may be many such "clicks" in a full rotation.

    This is actually similar to how a computer mouse works.
     
  8. 1eyepete

    1eyepete

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    Feb 11, 2013
    I have looked at the mouse option. Unfortunately I cannot over state how amateur I am. I need a simple circuit similar to a switch to match my skill level. 'Extra Circuitry' is what scares me off. :) I may have to settle for a rotary switch. For what I am doing this would be acceptable. Thank you for your suggestion.
     
  9. 1eyepete

    1eyepete

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    Feb 11, 2013
    Thanks for your suggestion. My head just about popped when trying to figure out how this would work. :)
    I may pull a few more mice apart to see if I can make this work for me.

    I appreciate your time in replying.
     
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,496
    2,837
    Jan 21, 2010
    Mice (ones with balls) use this method, and will have a pair of light sources and detectors with a slotted wheel between them. The positioning of the sources/sensors gives a quadrature signal. They don't use an actual switch.

    Can you find a mouse with balls these days?
     
  11. 1eyepete

    1eyepete

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    Feb 11, 2013
    I actually have a mouse with a ball and pulled it apart last night. I managed to see what you are talking about with the on off signals. Interesting stuff. Still not sure how I would use that signal. I ran out of time with my experimentation. It appeared the on off signals went into a chip(?) of some sort before heading to the USB cable. I will continue to experiment with this to see if there is a signal I can use.

    This is fun, thanks for your input.
     
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