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Milwaukee Sawzall Repair

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by patdio58, Jun 18, 2011.

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  1. patdio58

    patdio58

    4
    0
    Jun 18, 2011
    I have a Milwaukee #6509-21 3/4 stroke sawzall that stopped working.Not very old and not used for heavy cutting.I have a 12 amp 1 1/8 stroke for heavy use.I was wondering if there are simple trouble shooting tips or a place I can find a manual to download about trouble shooting?
     
  2. TBennettcc

    TBennettcc

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    2
    Dec 4, 2010
    How good are you with general troubleshooting? How good are you with electronics? Do you know how to use a multimeter? Do you feel comfortable opening up the device? Is the device still under warranty?

    Help us help you. :)
     
  3. patdio58

    patdio58

    4
    0
    Jun 18, 2011
    To TCBennet Reply on Milwaukee Sawzall repair

    Thank you for responding,Yes I do know how to use a multimeter and I have started to troubleshoot by checking voltage.But I am not sure exactly what I am supposed to get for readings at certain place,for instance at the brushes it was only showing 2.2 volts.The tool is just out of warranty.So if you can help me I would appreciate it very much.I am a Plumbing and Heating contractor and have a 1 1/8 stroke for ripping out but I need the 3/4 stroke for more "surgical procedures" that I have to some times do.
    Thanks
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,505
    2,852
    Jan 21, 2010
    OK, lets see what we're up against.

    Can you tell us how it failed. (e.g. it just didn't turn on, or it stopped while I was using it, or it went slower and slower until it wouldn't work any more).

    What controls does it have? On/off, high/low speed control, continuously variable speed.

    How is is powered, mains, or battery?
     
  5. daddles

    daddles

    443
    3
    Jun 10, 2011
    Here's an opinion: it's likely the electronic controller failed, assuming it's variable speed. The ones I've seen are single units and can't be fixed. Again, this is just an opinion based on the electrical tools I've had over the last few decades. Obviously, before you replace the unit, inspect the other stuff carefully and measure resistances to find an obvious failures. But the electronic control units have always been the weak link from what I've seen (same is true for appliances, which is why I always buy stuff with mechanical controls).

    Alas, you may be surprised by the replacement cost. I once saw a manufacturer quote me a cost for a replacement board (it was sometime in the 1990's, but built with crappy old 1970's electronics technology) for around $200 -- and the whole appliance only cost us $250. Needless to say, that POS went to the dump and I bought a mechanical unit that has operated without a flaw ever since.
     
  6. patdio58

    patdio58

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    Jun 18, 2011
    Steve thanks for replying.
    It is a variable speed 11 amp.It starting making a small scrapping noise about an hour before it stopped working completely.The brushes look good and so does the armature.But beyond that I'm kind of lost as to how to trouble shoot.I hate to just chuck it.I like the 3/4 stroke for tight spots and cuts that take a little finesse with.I do have a 1 1/8 stroke which is great for ripping out but not so good at the finer cuts.
    Thanks for anything you can suggest.
     
  7. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,505
    2,852
    Jan 21, 2010
    OK, that's good information.

    The fact that it started making odd noises before it failed may be indicative of some sort of bearing failure, or other fault that increased the load on the motor. It is quite possible that this lead to significantly increased current , or perhaps slower speeds and therefore overheating and failure of *something*

    That something could be the motor, the bearings, the electronics, or the batteries (assuming it has a battery pack)

    You need to test, as far as you can, to determine where the fault lies.

    If it still makes some sort of sound when you try to start it up, then it may be a bearing seized. If the battery is low in voltage (or better yet) won't work in a similar unit, then it's the battery. Motor or controller failure can really only be detected by taking the unit apart and testing the continuity of the motor windings, and the presence/absence of voltage on them when it's turned on.

    BEWARE of doing tests with the unit open. If it turns out that the problem is a jam, or if it's a loose wire that you connect up again, then consider what happens if the unit suddenly comes to life at full speed whilst open in front of you. Please make sure you keep all of your fingers firmly attached to your hands, and eyeballs in their sockets, etc.

    If you've checked the armature, then I would suggest it's a controller fault. If you can rule everything else out, then we're going to need a series of photos of the controller so we can suggest where to go to next.
     
  8. patdio58

    patdio58

    4
    0
    Jun 18, 2011
    Milwaukee sawzall repair.

    Thank you Steve.
    It is a power cord model.Could you suggest a list of tests to determine proper voltage to specific areas.I did start testing,but was not sure what voltages I should have and where.I did not seem to get 120v anywhere while plugged in.I bypassed trigger switch and wired directly to white and black load wires however there was another black wire coming out of the trigger which I could not determine what it was for.Thanks
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,505
    2,852
    Jan 21, 2010
    I really wouldn't want to make guesses.

    Some photos might be good. We may be able t suggest where you can measure for continuity. I would be somewhat reluctant to jump into measuring voltages while it's plugged into the mains.
     
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