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microwave oven power cooking levels?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by wave, Dec 8, 2004.

  1. NSM

    NSM Guest

    | No steenkin' "rubber" seal on my 20 year old Monkey Ward microwave.
    |
    | Jonesy

    Have we beaten this subject to death yet or would the other 100 million
    microwave owners like to chip in?

    N
     
  2. Sorry, you'll have to translate that for me. I don't speak American.

    --
    Regards,
    Nicolaas.


    .... We are worthy of only as much respect as we are prepared to give
    others.
     
  3. And neither of them anything like as bad as some clown trying to pretend
    he/she/it is the moderator.

    --
    Regards,
    Nicolaas.


    .... When you argue with a fool, chances are that the fool you are arguing
    with is doing the same thing.
     
  4. Asimov

    Asimov Guest

    "Franc Zabkar" bravely wrote to "All" (18 Dec 04 07:39:15)
    --- on the heady topic of "Re: new microwave oven with no seal?"

    FZ> From: Franc Zabkar <>

    FZ> On Fri, 17 Dec 2004 17:48:34 +1300, Lawrence D9Oliveiro
    FZ> Wouldn't a rubber seal exacerbate leakage issues? I mean, wouldn't it
    FZ> effectively *create* a gap through which microwaves could leak?

    Maybe "metalized" silicon rubber is a good shield for microwaves?

    A*s*i*m*o*v

    .... Puddy-tat's not so bwave in Gwanny's microwave!
     
  5. Jim Adney

    Jim Adney Guest

    Well, that would certainly increase the stability, but I think you'd
    still have trouble supporting it at each power pole. I could imagine
    some kind of internal support at each support point, but that sounds
    like a nightmare to install at every tower.

    Adding the tongue and groove to the keyhole shape would be even
    better, but you'd still be limited by the shear strength of the
    tongue, which is not very great for copper or aluminum.

    Does anyone know if any of this has actually been used, or was it just
    someone's pipe dream?

    -
     
  6. Asimov

    Asimov Guest

    "NSM" bravely wrote to "All" (18 Dec 04 00:01:10)
    --- on the heady topic of "Re: new microwave oven with no seal?"

    NS> From: "NSM" <>

    NS>
    NS> | No steenkin' "rubber" seal on my 20 year old Monkey Ward microwave.
    NS> |
    NS> | Jonesy

    NS> Have we beaten this subject to death yet or would the other 100
    NS> million microwave owners like to chip in?

    No chips in my microwave(s) door!

    A*s*i*m*o*v

    .... Bald spot? It's a solar panel for a sex machine.
     
  7. NSM

    NSM Guest

    | <
    | > Like the difference between John McCain and George Bush?
    |
    | Sorry, you'll have to translate that for me. I don't speak American.

    Like the difference between waking up with Diana Rigg or Margaret Thatcher?

    N
     
  8. NSM

    NSM Guest

    | And neither of them anything like as bad as some clown trying to pretend
    | he/she/it is the moderator.

    Then let us hope you never fall into that trap!
     
  9. Jim Adney

    Jim Adney Guest

     
  10. In the immortal words of one Eliza Doolittle, "Not BLOODY likely!"

    --
    Regards,
    Nicolaas.


    .... Knowledge is good; it is better if we can use it to do good.
     
  11. Understood now.

    --
    Regards,
    Nicolaas.


    .... Children need models, not critics.
     
  12. Adder

    Adder Guest

    throw away that stone age newsreader with the windows 3.1 user interface
    and get a proper one that ignores HTML
     
  13. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

     
  14. NSM

    NSM Guest

    | Tubular chassis aren't solid, they're hollow tubes as the name implies,
    ask
    | anybody who's worked on race cars. For the weight, a hollow tube is
    stronger
    | than a solid rod, note that this is weight, not diameter, yes a solid rod
    of
    | the same diameter is stronger than a hollow one, but many times heavier.

    For a given weight of material, maximum strength is obtained by distributing
    it over the greatest cross sectional area possible, up to the point at which
    it becomes too thin to resist buckling.

    N
     
  15. Jim Adney

    Jim Adney Guest

    You're right, of course, but what I meant, was that a tube is a single
    piece, hence solid even though hollow. The preceeding discussion was
    of a "tube" made up of a bunch of separate strips.

    I don't think there are any race cars out there which use chassis made
    of tubes which consist of a bunch of separate strips. I think you'd
    agree that this would be a structural waste of effort.

    -
     
  16. Jim Adney

    Jim Adney Guest

    Interesting, I never thought of it that way. Of course it's only true
    if you include the inner hollow as part of the cross section.

    Your last clause is the gotcha. That point is the hard one to
    determine. ;-)

    -
     
  17. NSM

    NSM Guest

    |
    | >For a given weight of material, maximum strength is obtained by
    distributing
    | >it over the greatest cross sectional area possible, up to the point at
    which
    | >it becomes too thin to resist buckling.
    |
    | Interesting, I never thought of it that way. Of course it's only true
    | if you include the inner hollow as part of the cross section.
    |
    | Your last clause is the gotcha. That point is the hard one to
    | determine. ;-)

    That's why they pay engineers the big bucks. Hope the engineer for that new
    French bridge got the math right!

    N
     
  18. NSM

    NSM Guest

    | You're right, of course, but what I meant, was that a tube is a single
    | piece, hence solid even though hollow. The preceeding discussion was
    | of a "tube" made up of a bunch of separate strips.
    |
    | I don't think there are any race cars out there which use chassis made
    | of tubes which consist of a bunch of separate strips. I think you'd
    | agree that this would be a structural waste of effort.

    The edge connections would inevitably be weak points. Didn't Titanic pop
    many of her joints when she hit the berg?

    N
     
  19. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    IIRC the steel itself fractured, it had a high sulphur content and was
    especially brittle in the frigid water.
     
  20. Don Hills

    Don Hills Guest

    Early microwaves had a mechanical seal - a compressible wire mesh that was
    squashed in the gap between door and frame to seal it. This was easily
    damaged or torn right off. Modern microwaves have an electrical seal. The
    door edge contains a quarter-wave "trap" (cavity) that runs right around the
    door. Microwaves leaking down the gap between door and frame enter the
    cavity, bounce back from its end and arrive at the opening to the cavity out
    of phase with the waves entering, thus canceling each other. It's like a
    "short circuit" for radio waves. The door still has to fit reasonably well,
    hence the warnings about not using it if the door is warped or doesn't close
    properly.
     
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