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Microphone Calibration

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Raven Luni, Apr 13, 2012.

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  1. Raven Luni

    Raven Luni

    798
    8
    Oct 15, 2011
    Greetings,

    Obtaining a true frequency response for a microphone is something I've been wondering about for a while. Everything I've seen either talks about expensive equipment, anechoic chambers etc, or speaker design. I'm interested in a much broader frequency range than the audible and in a true rather than pleasant sounding response so thats not much use to me.

    So I thought screw that and had a think about it for myself. The measuring part seems simple enough - either use a set of control frequencies or some white noise with a guaranteed even frequency distribution, then take the total energy for each frequency that is recorded and work out the equalisation from that.

    BUT first, you'd need a source.......
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    1,892
    Sep 5, 2009
    and you are going to need an airtight and echo free chamber (anechoic chamber) of some sort, else your measurements will be tainted.

    a respectable audio signal generator would be a good start. I havent seen sales for white noise generators, but Im sure they exist :)


    Dave
     
  3. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

    10,585
    2,360
    Nov 17, 2011
    You will have to take into account the characteristics of the speaker, too. The signal generator alone is no help if you don't have a speaker (or something similar) to convert the signal to sound. And the speaker is probably the worse part of the equation. Whereas a microphone can have a fairly linear behaviour over a wide range of frequencies, a speaker normally doesn't.You'll have to "subtract" (not exactly in the mathematical sense) the speaker's frequency response from your measurements.
    How to calibrate a speaker and/or microphone is described e.g. here: http://www.daqarta.com/dw_0axx.htm

    It might be cheaper to buy a calibrated microphone with a known charcteristic, e.g. http://www.linearx.com/products/microphones/m31/M31_3.htm

    Harald
     
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