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Microcontrollers For C

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by Hiigarangh7, Nov 30, 2012.

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  1. Hiigarangh7

    Hiigarangh7

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    Nov 30, 2012
    Hey, I'm new to the forums, and an electronic newbie. I'm intending to do a project involving RC equipment. But, before I do so, I'm starting off with smaller projects to lead up to the larger one.

    Any how, I wanted to know any good micro controllers out in the market that can be programmed by the C/C++ programming language. I heard of PIC, but I've searched about, and I only see PIC. I wanted to know if there are others out there?
     
  2. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    Just about any brand micro on the market will have a 'C' flavored compiler, it's pretty much become industry standard...

    You will likely find the most support for the two big ones AVRs and PICs... But, the new family of ARM processors is coming on strong as well...
     
  3. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Wikipedia lists 16 different manufacturers of different types of microcontroller.
     
  4. Hiigarangh7

    Hiigarangh7

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    Nov 30, 2012
    Great. Any specific ones that you would suggest? I'm brand new to micro controllers, except when its PLCs. So, when it comes to performance, or data, which ones would you say are good for a beginner like me?
     
  5. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    Loaded question and a lot of it is personal preference, on chip brand unless you have specific requirements that lean in one direction or another... I personaly like PIC chips, but others swear by AVR or ARM... FYI just because I like PIC doesn't mean I'm 100% devoted to PIC, I have and will continue to use AVRs and even ARM or whatever if it better suits the needs of the job or is requested by the client...

    http://www.mikroe.com/ offers many 'cost friendly' compilers that IMO are idea for the newbie to play with...

    But, that is not to say there are not 100 other compilers on the market (some officially supported by the chip manufactures) that should be ignored...

    In the end you just need to decide upon one make the investment and see if it pans out... And if it doesn't all is not lost as you might very well fall back on that platform at a later date, and/or you will find that the knowledge gained will port right over to your new pursuits...

    The Arduino AVR platform is like crack to many hobbyist right now, it's low cost and has a lot of support, but it has a wonky flavor of C that many true C programmers find annoying...
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2012
  6. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

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    Depending on your application, I'd also suggest the Texas Instruments MSP430 series. There's a huge range of devices. They have a 16-bit core and are generally more capable than the PIC and AVR (though smaller than the ARM) and IMO the peripherals are pretty well-designed, which can make a big difference to the way your code is designed and the restrictions it has to endure.
     
  7. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    Apr 7, 2012
    Yeah, TI has been pushing their LaunchPad micros real hard as of late, and they seem to be gaining some ground... They do offer some very cost effective developer boards as well, I just received a couple of their ARM developer boards last week in fact, and at a significant subsidized price of $5 delivered when I ordered them a month ago...
     
  8. Rusty

    Rusty

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    Nov 30, 2012
    Im familiar with the Atmel controllers. They arent too expensive and easy to program. You'll need an programmer and a microcontroller. For smaller projects, the ATTINY is a good place to start. If you want to learn to program, I can recommend an educational board, such as:

    http://www.atmel.com/products/microcontrollers/avr/avr_xmega.aspx
     
  9. dpenelob

    dpenelob

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    Mar 27, 2013
    Another point for AVRs is that Atmel offers the programming environment "AVRStudio" for free opposed to the commercial products available for PIC, ARM, etc.
     
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