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Micro water pump

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by cpagan5, Feb 9, 2013.

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  1. cpagan5

    cpagan5

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    Feb 9, 2013
    Hi All, I hope I can get some help from someone here as I am a novice with electronic circuits. THe project i am working on requires a micro water pump that uses 1.5v/150mA to power. I need to run this on a battery pack and it needs to run for about 14 days. Since there are no battery packs that will run the pump for that long, I was thinking of putting it on a timer to cycle the pump on and off.

    I have a few questions (they may seem kinda dumb, but I dont know much about circuits.

    1) The pump runs at 1.5v / 150mA. Most battery packs are not at that voltage. WHat should I do to get the right voltage.

    2) Is there any standard circuits that I can build or make that will cycle on and off (1 hour on / 4 hours off)?

    3) Would a timer ciircuit use up alot of the battery capacity?

    THanks for the Help
    CP
     
  2. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    May 8, 2012
    Short of a microcontroller there are no off the shelf chips that will be suitable. Here's a thought though.. You can buy an inexpensive 1.5V clock movement like some of these.
    http://www.klockit.com/depts/dept.aspx?dept=157&order=pop&show=12&page=1
    The hour hand can be used to close and open the pump circuit that also runs off the same battery. The small AAA or AA battery that these use can be replaced with an external C or D cell. The hour hand can also be used to trip a Set-Reset Flip-Flop.

    Chris
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2013
  3. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    The pump takes about 1/4W and if my sums are correct, then a 12V 7A.hr battery will store sufficient energy to run continuously. You will need a buck convertor to drop the voltage but at this low voltage is unlikely to be very efficient.

    Chris's idea seems the easiest way to go. A magnet glued to the hour hand could turn on suitably placed reed switches.
     
  4. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    May 8, 2012
    Here are some further thoughts. If the hour hand is replaced with a disk with notches cut in in the circumference a little microswitch will easily switch the motor on and off following the timing sequence set by the notch and notch-less widths.

    Chris
     
  5. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    Apr 7, 2012
    A good cheap idea there Chris, I like it... A quick photo sensor circuit and a hole punch and you could make a real neat mechanical timer for cheap for a lot of experiments...
     
  6. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    Thanks CC. I like your photo sensor / punched holes idea too. My wife has used these little kits to make quite a few needle point clock faces. The AA battery runs them for over two years before replacement is needed.

    Chris
     
  7. cpagan5

    cpagan5

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    Feb 9, 2013
    THanks

    Thanks for all the help. I will let you know how the project works out.
     
  8. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    May 8, 2012
    Post some pix when you complete it.

    Chris
     
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