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Measuring room noise level

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Foltzmeister, Mar 17, 2015.

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  1. Foltzmeister

    Foltzmeister

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    Mar 17, 2015
    Hi all,

    I'm working on a project where I need to be able to measure sound in a room up to 120dB, A and C weighted. Basically it needs to be able to sense when the noise level rises above safe levels for the human ear. I've done a little research but since I don't know squat about audio I'm hoping someone who does can help me out. My main question is what microphone should/can I use? Ideally it would be cheap and small enough to fit on a PCB while still able to measure room noise level. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    nice kit, but obviously not calibrated and could be inaccurate by many dB's
    the OP gave the indication that it may need to be calibrated

    The fully calibrated one I build that goes into clubs, pubs etc is much more expensive than a basic kit

    @Foltzmeister what accuracy do you need ? and does it need to be calibrated for that accuracy ?

    Dave
     
  3. Foltzmeister

    Foltzmeister

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    Mar 17, 2015
    It would need to be pretty accurate, the user needs to be alerted if noise goes above a certain level for safety concerns. The alerting will be done by a microcontroller though, I just need a way to detect what the noise level is. I don't necessarily care about sound quality and all that.
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    Yup and that's the usual situation :)

    To get something that is calibrated for reasonable accuracy is going to cost you significant money
    They sell for around AU$900 to $1200 ( Around US$700 - $900)
     
  5. Foltzmeister

    Foltzmeister

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    Mar 17, 2015
    Couldn't you just build a circuit with a microphone then analyze the signal with the microcontroller? What part of the setup makes it so expensive?
     
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    because you want accuracy and as I said that requires calibration
    The calibrator I use to calibrate my units cost $500 on its own !!
     
  7. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    Aug 31, 2014
    You don' need any accurate calibration because the alarm will sound when a sustained amplitude is recorded over a period of time.
    You can buy a dB instrument for $15.00 (posted) to provide a reference.
    The micro kit will cost another $20.00
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2015
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    NO .... he needs calibration because it is what was stated as required so he knows the specific sound level
     
  9. Colin Mitchell

    Colin Mitchell

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    Aug 31, 2014
    I meant accurate calibration. Just use a $15.00 tester to provide some sort of reference.
     
  10. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    got a link to this tester ?
     
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