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Meaning of switched jack socket pins

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by TTL, Mar 3, 2017.

  1. TTL

    TTL

    182
    5
    Oct 24, 2013
    Regarding 1/4" (and probably also 3.5mm) switched audio jack sockets; which pin of the actual socket corresponds to which pin in the schematic part when it comes to the switch?

    And are switched jack sockets standardized in the way that they have 3 pins, the "tip" pin stays at is, while the "sleeve" and the third pin short whenever a jack plug is removed from the socket?
     
  2. Kabelsalat

    Kabelsalat

    105
    20
    Jul 5, 2011
    When the plug is held so it point to right, the connections is:
    Leftmost (biggest surface area): Ground
    Middle: Left channel
    Right (tip of connector): Right channel.
     
  3. TTL

    TTL

    182
    5
    Oct 24, 2013
    Sorry, I meant to say a switched mono socket. Not stereo.
     
  4. Kabelsalat

    Kabelsalat

    105
    20
    Jul 5, 2011
    The same, but middle contact isn't there and the tip is signal.
     
  5. TTL

    TTL

    182
    5
    Oct 24, 2013
    Here are a couple of symbols I found online, hopefully helping to explain my questions a little better:
    switched1.png switched2.png

    The above are 3.5mm types, but I assume the design is similar for 1/4" types?
    Anyway, I'm guessing that the pin with the "V" on it goes to the tip of the mono jack connector while the pin with the arrow connects to it when the jack plug is NOT inserted,thereby acting as a switch. And the third pin (with a rectangle on it) must go to the GND pin (sleeve? ring?). Have I got it right?


    How about the SK1 and SK2 jacks in this input amplifier circuit? SK1 appears to be inverted from SK2 (the "V" pin is upside-down in SK2 and the "arrow" pin goes the opposite way), and it appears there's also a second switch in parallel to the right of SK2. What's the deal with the upside-down parts of the symbol? Are the sockets different or isn't there a standardized way of drawing them?

    switched3.png
     
  6. Audioguru

    Audioguru

    2,580
    585
    Sep 24, 2016
    Your schematic has parts of the jack all over the place. Maybe this explains how it works:
     

    Attached Files:

  7. TTL

    TTL

    182
    5
    Oct 24, 2013
    Got it! Thanks :)
    If I want to label the different pins of that jack in a schematic, apart from "tip" (signal) and "sleeve" (GND) what would you call pins 4 and 5 in that illustration? "Switch" perhaps?
    [​IMG]

    And for that schematic -those jack symbols are a mess and not standardized, and the up and donw arrows in the jacks don't have any specific meaning?
     
  8. Audioguru

    Audioguru

    2,580
    585
    Sep 24, 2016
    Pins 4 and 5 are the "disconnected connections". Usually two speakers (stereo) are connected to them and the speakers are disconnected when the headphones plug is inserted.

    The arrows clearly show that their connection with the "V" (pin 2 or pin 3) is disconnected when a plug is inserted. I could not find a photo of a plug facing the correct direction for an insertion.

    Do you see how the connection for the tip is farther away from the sleeve than the ring connection? Same as the plug. The tip might be the left channel signal and the ring might be the right channel signal.
     
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