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Magnetic transmission?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Moha99, Apr 26, 2012.

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  1. Moha99

    Moha99

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    Nov 18, 2011
    Hallo everyone!

    I've came up with this video where an inventor shows a newer innovative way of transmission! I find it more efficient than usual systems that cause massive friction + magnets are more stronger than the conventional "pulley" or "gear" system I think they transfer a higher energy conservation rate then usual.

    What do you all think?

    Watch this!
     
  2. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    Apr 7, 2012
    Easy to spin a bearing supported light weight wheel under low speed with no load, I suspect it will fail miserably under high torque, high speeds or high loads unless it's massive...
     
  3. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    Those were my thoughts too, in practice is it really going to be able to turn 2 driving wheels of a car or the single driving wheel of a motorbike, once it has the weight of that load on the spinning wheel shaft

    Dave
     
  4. Moha99

    Moha99

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    Nov 18, 2011
    What if there were more magnets to the system? If the case is all about "torque" This model is practical under light object as he stated simple uses to it.

    perhaps if their were more strong and larger magnets it would be better?

    Only that? Nothing more? Can't their be an increase of one value to give it more torque?

    Could you elaborate more about the"in practice thing".
     
  5. Moha99

    Moha99

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    Nov 18, 2011
    Yea just thought about the torque as well looks like magnets aren't strong enough to sustain heavier objects... But I feel that could depend on the following:

    A. Magnetic power: Were there are countless kinds and types of magnets. it depends on the system I guess.
    B. Design: maybe if the magnets were aligned perfect so as the number of magnets would be more and more for example a SOUTH pole point lets say A usually has 1 magnet maybe if their were another magnet exactly next to it it could increase the magnetic field?

    I dunno I'm just expressing random things...

    What do you all say?
     
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    " in practice" ie "in the real world" where there are real loads of substantial mass (weight) significant frictions of shafts and bearings not to mention the friction of the spinning wheel to the road

    its one thing to be spinning a horizontal wheel on a relatively low friction shaft etc.
    whole different ball game when that wheel is vertical and sitting against a surface

    cheers
    Dave
     
  7. Moha99

    Moha99

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    Nov 18, 2011
    No no no consider that the wheel is horizontal or even vertical but not touching the surface and not carrying any weight just rotating a "shaft" or a "rotate" its not involved in the "automotive" world at all.

    I guess now I've painted a different picture haha
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    no my comments still stand, cuz regardless of if its horizontal or vertical, if its going to be any use it has to be able to do work, therefore its going to have a load of some sort

    else its just as in the video a spinning toy not achieving anything


    D
     
  9. Moha99

    Moha99

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    Nov 18, 2011
    So magnetic gears in general are not as promising as they sound to be huh?

    I would think there would be of great use but I'd like to study this more so the main problem is "torque" right thats it?
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2012
  10. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    Apr 7, 2012
    It's a pretty vital problem when you are talking about a transmission...
     
  11. Moha99

    Moha99

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    Nov 18, 2011
    Can it be solved though?
     
  12. timothy48342

    timothy48342

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    Nov 28, 2011
    I don't see this technology being used in automobile transmissions because of the reasons stated.

    "Can it be solved?" Can what be solved? Can we add extra magnets to transfer more torque? Sure. Add all you want. It may be that you need a huge device to accomplish what we already have with metal gears. For a general idea of just how much torque is being transfered, watch again in the third section where he talks about the inherent "overload protection." He grabs the big wheel with his hand and holds it still while still turning the little crank with his other hand. He wasn't thrown off balance or even straining in the least. He kept on talking. That's not a lot of torque.

    But this may still have some applications. He mentions that one wheel could be in a vacuum. We could probably find a way to do that without this technology by just driving a shaft through a wall and sealing it up real good. But the fact that there is no need for physical contact is nice. Not needing any lubricant is good, too in case of an atmosphereic environment that need to be closely controled. (Although the bearing still need lube, but they can be sealed well.) There are probably some things that could be done with this that we can't do now with physical gears. I can't think of anything specifically, but I think there is significant promise there.

    Anyway. This isn't going to replace all the transmissions in all our cars, but I think Hollywood should take note and use this in the next sci-fi film. Who runs the numbers when watchin a movie anyway?

    -tim
     
  13. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    Apr 7, 2012
    Yeah, a few small nylon gears could easily produce more torque...

    Every time I think of this, I can only imagine a HUGE device, before it becomes practical for the transmission of any real power... And with that comes the side effects of having such large magnets, you would be grabbing or effecting anything magnetic in the close vicinity...
     
  14. Moha99

    Moha99

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    Nov 18, 2011
    Thats the golden question I needed.

    True It cant be used in the "Automotive" Industry nor anything that has very small mechanical systems.

    But this transmission with more Neo. magnets could be the strongest and the most efficient that metal gears. Obviously it will be more expensive but hey its more sustainable in a way :D

    I've been playing around lately with a lot of magnets it kinda interesting. In fact all natural forces are amazingly mind blowing in a way... Force + Energy = hell of a combo hahaha

    Thank you Tim and everyone for you're inputs so far!
     
  15. Moha99

    Moha99

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    Nov 18, 2011
    Ah... Just when I thought i've dodged a bullet right there something else comes up lol!

    So the BIG magnets would consume everything magnetic lol? "I mean attract that is"

    No problems just hold it down properly and things could be avoided + using non magnetic materials are a good way too! "No metals are a good way!"
     
  16. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    Apr 7, 2012
    How do you hold down environmental objects or anything else you come across? Sure in a stationary housing that never moves you might be able to avoid or at least lower contact, but if it's mobile?

    I believe 'could' being the pivotal question... The bigger you make this object to compensate for it's lack of torque, the more it eats away at it's own efficiency due to size... Something as simple as air resistance starts to become a real lose as the size increases... Is starting, stopping and turning a multi-ton magnetic transmission going to be superior to a 10lb traditional gear transmission in the real cost vs efficiency world?
     
  17. Moha99

    Moha99

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    Nov 18, 2011
    Ah ok... I thought the bigger it becomes the better.

    The transmission is for a stationary system not mobile at all.
     
  18. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    Apr 7, 2012
    In some ways yes, all factors have to be considered...

    I can see a huge aerodynamically designed system being pretty efficient if held at a steady speed, low load, or even more efficient in a vacuum chamber...

    In the real world, as I previously stated, there is a cost vs efficiency factor that weighs heavy in most applications...
     
  19. Moha99

    Moha99

    261
    0
    Nov 18, 2011
    Ah ok... I thought the bigger it becomes the better.

    Obviously the smal 10lb gear is better but and cheaper and more efficient.

    Do you find this unnecessary and is this idea a dead one?

    How can I look more about the "torquing" problem? I'd like to study that more
     
  20. CocaCola

    CocaCola

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    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    Put it under load and see what it takes to overcome that load and spin... I can only guess, but I suspect that you will find it will need to be HUGE to handle any real load... And at that size when is it practical?

    For example if you need a house sized device (or even a room sized device) to transfer 100 ft/lbs of torque vs the traditional baseball sized metal gear tranny that does it fine, what application would this benefit and be practical?
     
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