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LT spice 'sprite'?

Discussion in 'CAD' started by Alfred Lorona, Nov 20, 2007.

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  1. scad3, Linear Technology spice requires a component to be 'sprited' before
    it can be rotated on a schematic. What in the world is 'sprited' and how do
    I 'sprite' a component so that I can rotate it?

    Thanks, AL
     
  2. Damir

    Damir Guest

    Click on the Move icon and than click on the component you
    want to rotate.After that rotate component with Ctrl+R.
    For mirroring component Ctrl+E.

    Damir
     
  3. Joel Koltner

    Joel Koltner Guest

    "Sprites" are graphical objects that are defined by their only memory
    somewhere and overlaid on top of the regular bitmap that makes up your
    display -- a mouse cursor is the most obvious example of a sprite (see:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sprite_(computer_graphics) -- for more on
    sprites).

    So all the documentation is telling you is that you need to get the part into
    a "draggable" (overlaid on the regular desktop) form before you can rotate the
    part. As the other poster mentioned, moving the component does this.

    The program's author probably wrote that documentation and was thinking a
    little too technically when he did so -- for the average user the description
    would definitely not be particularly clear!

    ---Joel
     
  4. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    Interesting. What I'd like is a "sprite" of a schematic I need to
    copy into PSpice, overlaid on the screen so I can place parts and
    wires in similar locations.

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  5. Fred Bartoli

    Fred Bartoli Guest

    Jim Thompson a écrit :
    Go Linux and you can use transparent windows... (no I never used it)

    I think .ista can do that too but I don't wish Vista to anybody.
     
  6. Joel Koltner

    Joel Koltner Guest

    Windows supported starting in Win2K, I believe, although the regular
    (Win2K/XP) desktop doesn't have a means of forcing a window to actually turn
    on the attribute that says, "I'm transparent." However, many video drivers
    do -- nVidia has various extra controls that I know for certain can, for
    instance.
     
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