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low power voltage reference recommendation

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by panfilero, May 30, 2013.

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  1. panfilero

    panfilero Guest

    Hello,

    I'm trying to find a low power voltage reference/regulator, I need 12V capable of delivering 1.5mA to a load, my input voltage range is from around 65V to 100V. I was looking at a TLVH431, but according to the datasheet it needs around a minimum of 1mA cathode current to regulate, since my input range is a bit wide that's going to go up as my input voltage goes up to its max. Anyone know of a better solution for this?

    much thanks!
     
  2. Guest

    something like these: http://www.centralsemi.com/content/product/cld/

    -Lasse
     
  3. Guest

    the idea was to use the cld instead of a resistor to feed the shunt
    reference
    keeping the current at a (constant) minimum

    it is hard to get around dissipating power...

    -Lasse
     
  4. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    Put a burden resistor on the reg?

    Jamie
     
  5. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    http://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/tps7a4001.pdf

    Jamie
     
  6. Maybe something like this?

    http://www.supertex.com/pdf/datasheets/LR645.pdf

    The fixed output version is 10V out, the adjustable will go to 12V.

    Lots of margin for spikes on the input (rated for 450V).

    --sp
     
  7. Nice part! The schematic looks a bit like JL's shunt regulator.

    Say John, for your third schematic (the shunt regulator) should you
    take the output from the 'upstream' side of the current limiting
    resistor?

    George H.
     
  8. That looks like a NEC Tokin piezo stack. When you get around to
    ordering production quanties we get a similar one from Bravo Electro
    Components
    http://www.bravoelectro.com/

    at about 1/3 of what thor labs charges.

    George H.
     
  9. Bill Sloman

    Bill Sloman Guest

    The inductor would store and return most of the energy. Your control circuit would only supply the rest - adding flexibility and taking out any temperature drifts.

    Farnell stocks "power chokes" in that ball park

    http://au.element14.com/epcos/b82732f2601b001/choke-frame-core-68mh-0-6a/dp/1644858

    offers 68mH - you'd need three in series - and can take 600mA. They are intended to be used "current compensated" for mains filtering, so it's not a slam dunk, but might be worth thinking about.
     
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