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Long range radio control

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Abdul Ahad, Nov 22, 2003.

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  1. Abdul Ahad

    Abdul Ahad Guest

    I was looking to develop a long range (3 to 5km) radio device that
    will respond to simple commands like up/down/left/right, using
    existing hardware already used in some other application.

    Does any one have a suggestion as to what *existing* application is
    available out there that can be used to do this with minimal
    modifications? (I think radio control gadgets for model airoplanes and
    helicopters will not have the range to do this?)

    thanks
    AA
    http://uk.geocities.com/aa_spaceagent/spacesystems2.html
     
  2. If it is line of sight, the RC stuff is fine!
    Thru buildings etc. is not so fine.



    --
    *
    | __O Thomas C. Sefranek
    |_-\<,_ Amateur Radio Operator: WA1RHP
    (*)/ (*) Bicycle mobile on 145.41, 448.625 MHz

    http://hamradio.cmcorp.com/inventory/Inventory.html
    http://www.harvardrepeater.org
     
  3. Abdul Ahad

    Abdul Ahad Guest

    Yes, it will be for mainly line of sight application. But I thought
    most RC trans/ceivers for model airplanes, etc were limited in range
    to 400-500 metres maximum? I am talking about using over 3,000 to
    5,000 metre range or higher!

    Are you able to suggest a UK site where I could buy a trans/ceiver
    unit of at least 4 channels for up/down/left/right controls with this
    kind of range?

    cheers
     
  4. Mac

    Mac Guest

    No way. High quality RC units (e.g., those for airplanes and gliders) will
    work long after the airplane shrinks from view. I can't swear they will
    work at 5km, but I'm sure you'll get at least 2km. Testing would be easy. In
    the USA, it is illegal to use this stuff for anything besides RC. UK
    probably has similar laws. Make sure what you are trying to do is legal.
    Futaba is one major brand. There are quite a few others. RC units come in
    transmiters and receivers. The receivers are set up to drive servo motors
    directly. That may or may not suit your purposes.

    What are you trying to do, anyway?

    Mac
    --
     
  5. James Meyer

    James Meyer Guest

    A cellular telephone handset with a simple audio to control interface
    would allow you almost unlimited range. Plus, you get a two-way connection in
    the bargain. Telemetry and control in one cheap, easy to use package.

    I don't think security would be a problem either. If the line's busy,
    just don't take off.

    Jim
     
  6. Abdul Ahad

    Abdul Ahad Guest

    This sounds good in theory. So just how do you go about adapting a
    Nokia mobile phone for 2 way telemetry uplink/downlink? I wanted to
    send uplink commands to a rocket payload during flight to, say, for
    example switch a video camera on/off or adjust attitude or fire a
    descent stage engine, etc. Even better, is there any way of attaching
    a small video camera directly to the mobile handset to transmit live
    video stream via the 3G mobile network for reception down on the
    ground?

    ....Just exploring the possibilities, here, but will investigate
    legalities later.

    cheers
    Abdul Ahad
     
  7. Ian Stirling

    Ian Stirling Guest

    The mobile phone people tend to get pissed if you put the handset up too
    high, it does bad things to their networks if it can see too many cell sites.
     
  8. James Meyer

    James Meyer Guest

    Almost any cell phone will have an earphone output and a microphone
    input for adding a headset to it. That gives you the capability of two-way
    communication of a band of frequencies between .3 and 3KHz. Amateur radio
    operators use "slow scan" video transmissions in that bandwidth and early model
    aircraft control systems sent different individual audio tones in that bandwidth
    to switch on or off servos to cperate control surfaces in a "bang-bang" or
    non-proportional fashion. You can even reliably stuff 300 baud ASCII data
    through a voice grade bandwidth connection with a simple modem.

    Jim
     
  9. So it's said. However, I've had terrible problems getting adequate
    range with conventional RC gear and nowhere near the kind of range you
    claim possible here. The legal limit in the UK is 100mW., which sounds
    adequate, but isn't, IMV. The obvious solution - legalities aside - is
    to 'strap-on' a couple of class C amplifying stages to bump this power
    level up a bit to say half to one Watt. In fact this is something I've
    had to consider myself; not for increased range so much as overcoming
    other RF interference from the environment in which I use R/C (TV
    studio like surroundings). And let's face it: with flying models, the
    last thing you want is to lose control of the bloody thing and end up
    killing someone (as recently happened in Bexley) just for the sake of
    a few tenths of a Watt!
     
  10. Ken Maltby

    Ken Maltby Guest

    I can't believe this thread! Have none of you heard of 9/11?

    While "Abdul" is probably just "fishing" for this very response,
    do you really need to be so helpful?

    Did you all vote for the mayor of London?


     
  11. Tim Auton

    Tim Auton Guest

    The arsehole who sorted out the traffic and public transport? I didn't
    bother to vote as it was obvious he would win, but had it been closer
    I would have. Anyway, what has Ken Livingstone got to do with the
    price of fish?


    Tim
     
  12. James Meyer

    James Meyer Guest

    So I can't use my handset while I'm airborn and piloting my own
    aircraft?

    Jim
     
  13. James Meyer

    James Meyer Guest

    You're quite right. I think we ought to track down and summarily
    terminate with exterme prejudice anyone who posts messages on this forum. I
    think this should continue that action until there are no more posts whatsoever
    here.

    I know that I'd feel a lot more secure if this were done.

    Jim
     
  14. Ian Stirling

    Ian Stirling Guest

    Not in the UK at least, I believe I don't know exactly what legislation they
    rely on.
     
  15. Ken Maltby

    Ken Maltby Guest

     
  16. Ken Maltby

    Ken Maltby Guest

    I'm just going by the coverage of his speeches during
    President Bush's visit.
     
  17. Tim Auton

    Tim Auton Guest

    I've not seen them but knowing "Red Ken" Livingstone they would have
    been distinctly anti-war and anti-spending-£7m-on-protecting-Bush. He
    was speaking at anti-war protests even before (more) troops even went
    to Iraq so I can guess the content of his speeches.

    He's an old-school left-winger. He was elected as a "**** you" to
    Thatcher (who eliminated London's right to a degree of self-rule for
    political reasons) and the Labour party (who refused to allow
    Livingstone onto the shortlist for official Labour candidate when they
    reintroduced that right). He was the "mayor" back in the 80s
    (different title at the time, but similar principle) and Londoners
    were monumentally pissed off that their degree of self-government was
    reduced. They were also monumentally pissed off at Blair's New Labour
    for refusing to allow him the chance to become their official
    candidate. The result was that he left the party, stood as an
    independent and took a landslide victory. Democracy in action, despite
    the will of politicians. I don't live in London any more, though I did
    for the first couple of years of his reign. He made a genuine
    difference, a good difference. I wouldn't give him control of the
    economy but a left-wing approach to transport (more busses, fewer cars
    - with carrot and stick in equal measure) has been a triumph. There is
    much more that he has done as mayor than that, but I can't be arsed to
    write a full biography.


    Tim
     
  18. Mac

    Mac Guest

    I certainly agree that the last thing you want is to lose control of a
    flyer!

    Hmm. I'm in the US, not the UK. But I've seen guys fly very expensive RC
    gliders at least half a mile away. Also, I know there are people who launch
    very large RC gliders and then follow them with jeeps and such. I imagine
    that they must be at least two miles away at times. A mile is something
    like 1100m, for those of you who are accustomed to sane units of measure.
    (Do they still use miles and yards on the road signs in the UK?)

    Also, I don't know what the power limit is in the US, but I do know that
    the band isn't licensed for anything but RC, so interference (in theory)
    shouldn't be a big problem. Although it sounds like you are in a noisy
    environment.

    Mac
    --
     
  19. James Meyer

    James Meyer Guest

     
  20.  
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