Connect with us

LME49811 as a guitar amp.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by CorySCline, Sep 2, 2011.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. CorySCline

    CorySCline

    8
    0
    Aug 23, 2011
    Hello all!

    Having successfully completed my first successful circuit (a 9V powered guitar amp using the LM386N-4 chip), I would like to move on by making a full size performance level amplifier. I have done a little bit of research and considered building the P1eX from www.ax84.com but the cost is too great. I am looking into building a tube free amp (I guess that would be called solid state?....maybe?). I have looked into using the LME49811 and the associated circuit in this datasheet. However, I have a couple of questions.

    1) Would this chip even be suitable for use as a guitar amp? (Mono input, sound quality, etc)
    2) How would I make this be powered by a 110V wall plug? (I have never attempted working with mains voltages, so ANY advice will be great)

    Thanks!
     
  2. CorySCline

    CorySCline

    8
    0
    Aug 23, 2011
    Well I have decided that it WILL be suitable for my needs. Now I just need an answer to Q #2. How do I go about picking a power supply for my needs? It looks like the schematic calls for 20V~110V Operating power as the main supply and a +5V rail for the Hi-Temp Shutdown Circuitry. I was able to find one with a +5V and a +48V on digikey....for 625 dollars. There HAS to be a cheaper option of powering this chip. What I would like are either: links to power supplies that would work or links to tutorials for building them. Either would suffice :)
     
  3. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    Look at the schematic again, it needs dual supplies, i.e. a + and - high voltage supplies. The 5V is not really a problem, this is just a logic input and can be provided by a voltage divider run from the + supply, since it will not require much current.

    Bob
     
  4. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    I did some looking and I confimed that high voltage high power power supplies are quite expensive.

    I think your best bet would be to look for a cheap used receiver or amp with the kind of power you will want and take out the power supply from it.

    Bob
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-