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Limit Switch instead of Bumper Switch?

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by Mrjojo, Jun 7, 2011.

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  1. Mrjojo

    Mrjojo

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    Jun 7, 2011
    Hey guyz , im building a robot n its main functionality is to avoid obstacles , that means if it bumps a box , it changes direction n tries another path .
    i know i had to buy bumper switch so robot identify obstacles on its way , made a mistake because of the image n didnt know it's actually a limit switch , cause limit n bumper switches look pretty much the same ~ so is there any way i can use limit switch as bumper a switch ? if not is there any other way i can do this ? need ur advice.
    ty in advance :)
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I guess it all comes down to your ingenuity.

    basically all you need is something that moves when your robot bumps into something, and to have this actuate some sort of switch.
     
  3. Mrjojo

    Mrjojo

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    Jun 7, 2011
    well it's my 1st robotic project n i don know much of electronics either , so does that mean that i can use limit switch ?
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Possibly. Can you make some sort of bumper that pushes the limit switch when it hits something?

    If you can show us a picture of the limit switch (or better the specs for it) then maybe someone can come up with suggestions.
     
  5. Mrjojo

    Mrjojo

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    Jun 7, 2011
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Oh, easy. You need to make some sort of bumper that pushes the lever when it hits something.

    The hard part is making it sensitive to pressure anywhere.

    If you have a number of these switches you might be able to attach a short bumper to the lever on each one. Anything hitting the bumper should activate the switch.

    The more and smaller your bumpers the more accurately you'll (potentially) know where the robot was hit, but (potentially) the more difficult the logic. The fewer and larger the bumpers, the harder they are to engineer.
     
  7. Mrjojo

    Mrjojo

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    Jun 7, 2011
    thank u! that was good news n very useful tips :) ill send the results here later on . ty :D
     
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