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Light Unpolarizer

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Nov 7, 2012.

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  1. Guest

    Is there such a thing ?

    I know how LCDs work and it's obvious for the most part, polarized light iscoming out of them. Years ago I was getting gas and wearing polarized sunglasses. I couldn't see the display on the pump, I thought it was defunct actually, things break. But I look closer of course and my head tilts a bit and I begine to see it. So I tilt my head alot and of course it dawned on me.. It was polarized the wrong way.

    I believe I am qualified to say the engineer made it the wrong way because for polarized sunglasses to work they must have a certain polar orientation.. Glare contains more light of one polarization than the other because of being reflected at a somewhat oblique angle. It is "squished".

    We on the same page here ? As such, the engineer who designed the display should have known which polarization NOT to use and designed accordingly. Ohyes it is far fetched to ask a guy to think of everything like that, but that's why they get the big bucks. I can bitch, but not draw and quarter thedude.

    Anyway the other day my buddy shows up and he's got new glasses and though not tinted, they are supposedly polarized. I know a little optics and I hada look at his glasses and I see one his main problem is astigmatism. Then he tells me they're polarized so I broke out my cellphone and looked through the lenses while turning, but it didn't darken. I'm thinking maybe they can't polarize it so well not tinted but that's bullshit because it just can't work that way.

    So either his glasses are not really polarized or my elcheapo phone has an unpolarizer. I'm sure that if an unpolarizer exists it would be in use because alot of people have polarized sunglasses. However I am having a hard time fathoming just how such a thing would work. In a way it would have to produce something that is not there.

    If such a "filter" exists, it is just one of those things of which I am notyet aware. Would a diffuser unpolarize light ? Damifino.

    Also, LCD TVs. Take it a step further, if you have an LCD projection set, is the light still polarized when it hits the screen ?

    Yahoo answers fell flat on their face with this one. First of all the question was FUBARed IMO. The OP was talking about multiple filters and how if at 45 degrees and all this shit, bla bla bla.

    Google kept trying to go for unpolarized, which is no good of course.

    Any of that type of engineer around here like to field the question ?

    J
     
  2. yes, many things will undifuse polarized light, like plastic.

    here's two photos of this

    http://www.panix.com/~presence/D700-polarized-vial-02-15-09.jpg

    This was taken with a polarizer. The "black" background is a huge LCD
    monitor displaying bright white. The polarizer on the came is set to block
    this, but the empty plastic vial changes the polarization, making it show
    up as bright white.

    Same effect here with some safety glasses, you can see the stresses in the
    lense against the frames as well

    http://www.panix.com/~presence/D700-polarized-glasses-02-15-09.jpg
     
  3. Guest

    Seriously excellent pics. It's not the cool lookingness of it, it's the wayit was made. However does it prove that it unpolarizes the light or just gives it a twist naturally, like an LCD would ?

    Anything to do with circularly polarized light does nothing to answer this.I do find it an interesting subject though. Circularly polarized light is not likely to be usable by LCD displays because twisting the light would make no differece.

    At any rate, I am talking about something that actually unpolarizes polarized light. Does such a thing exist ? Those pictures don't prove it because under those test conditions all it has to do is twist a bit. It might be interesting to see a motion video of that and have the cameraperson tilt the camera one way and the other and see what happens.

    J
     
  4. I do recall the plastic vial appeared bright in any angle, so it's safe
    to say is was unpolarizing light from any angle, and not just twisting it
    or whatever that would be called.

    The safety glasses had to he held just right to get the glow effect.

    I just tested a few more objects and the only things that consistently
    unpolarized or just diffused the light from the LCD monitor were
    polypropylene bags or objects like the good quality deli containers and
    antistatic plastic bags, the metallized ones. I'd like to try one of the
    many sheets of plastic as used in LCD panels, but behind the glass. They
    all have very odd properties.
     
  5. Robert Macy

    Robert Macy Guest

    Is it possible to see the polarized effect with the naked eye? On
    these types of glasses, I see the stresses at the corners where
    plastic is mounted as rainbow hues, very disturbing - interpret as
    cheapness.
     
  6. well, anything optical made out of plastic is cheap to start with. There's
    going to be streeses in mounted lenses. I've noticed it in glasse lenses
    in metal frames as well.
     
  7. I am talking about something that actually unpolarizes
    Yes. A non-metallic reflective surface.
     
  8. Robert Macy

    Robert Macy Guest

    Thanks for the detail experiments!

    Remembering back, years ago when driving in bright sunlight after a
    rainfall, I used to tilt my head back and forth and marvel at how the
    sheen of light reflecting off the wet pavement would change. Didn't
    correlate to polarized light, just thought the effect was 'interesting'
     
  9. Guest

    Hmmmmm. There are people here who know alot more about physics than I, but I do remember something about that. Most metals conduct and most conductors reflect light. I guess that means they are usually opaque ?

    However any smooth surface can reflect.

    Totally black plastic can be polished to a mirror finish and though it will reflect alot of light, you can still tell.

    So is it that something that does not conduct electricity will do this ?

    J
     
  10. Nope. :)

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  11. I am talking about something that actually unpolarizes
    Then why was it that projecting 3D slides at home required a metallized
    screen?
     
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