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Light house flasher

Discussion in 'LEDs and Optoelectronics' started by HLOW, Jan 24, 2013.

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  1. HLOW

    HLOW

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    0
    Jan 24, 2013
    I would like to build a 120 V light controller to simulate a light house. I have a circuit that will do this with an LED but I need an interface to control the 120V light. Can anyone recommend the component I'm looking for?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Miguel Lopez

    Miguel Lopez

    252
    63
    Jan 25, 2012
    The one called TRIAC, or the other called IGBT. Sorry, my knowledge on them is just informative.
     
  3. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    Actually, you should use a solid state relay, which is designed for exactly this purpose. Get one that is opitcally coupled and designed for 120V AC at a current above what you need. The control line actually drives and LED so you can use your LED flasher as is!

    Bob
     
  4. HLOW

    HLOW

    12
    0
    Jan 24, 2013
    I want to control the intensity with a 0-5 VDC input and have the out put 120VAC to drive the lamp. I want it to come up to full intensity in a half a second and back to off in the same amount of time. I have the input circuit complete but need help with the 120VAC lamp part
     
  5. Starbuckin

    Starbuckin

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    0
    Jan 22, 2013
    I agree with Bob, easiest way to go is with a solid state relay.
    A quick search on Ebay produced a suitable result for only $1.99...

    Of course this will only allow you to turn the light on and off, I believe (someone correct me if I am wrong)...

    If you want the lamp to fade up to bright, then fade back out in one second as you stated, then I think you're going to need a suitable TRIAC and drive it with Pulse Width Modulated signal from your input circuit. A couple of LM555 timers could easily do that.
     
  6. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    You can get SSRs that have zero cross output, which would allow you to make an isolated dimming circuit. The circuit would simply have a variable delay after zero cross goes high before switching it on every half cycle.

    Bob
     
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