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LED lighting use

Discussion in 'LEDs and Optoelectronics' started by tedstruk, Jan 5, 2013.

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  1. tedstruk

    tedstruk

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    Jan 7, 2012
    dum idea...
    I thought, from my electronics class, that LEDs are not installed with watts in mind, because thats what they are supposed to replace,; ie. real power hungry lights like argon gas bulbs(application cave mining). actually, according to the instructor, they are more power hungry that a standard bulb, and as a rule of thumb require 1amp per light to drive them(dum idea trying to replace argon gas as a lighting medium...). So in a circuit of 100 LEDs you would be required to deliver a constant 100amps of power to light the bulb. I power almost all of my house with breakers less than 50amps.
     
  2. donkey

    donkey

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    Feb 26, 2011
    LEDs ARE power hungry but then they blow. this is why you limit the amps with a resistor.
    anyway do you have a question here or is this an observation?
     
  3. John01

    John01

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    Dec 30, 2012
    Are we talking LED's..As-in individual LED's x100.. Or the type of LED lights that are used to replace ordinary incandescent bulbs?
     
  4. donkey

    donkey

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    Feb 26, 2011
    either way LED's are superior to incandescent bulbs for energy saving. As for actual lighting I miss incandescent... the new lights play with my eyes too much
     
  5. John01

    John01

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    Dec 30, 2012
    Agreed :)

    I was trying to perhaps gain some more info from the OP as to maybe assist in the current consumption side of things regarding LED's, as obviously 100x ordinary individual LED's would consume far less current than 100x household type LED's :)
     
  6. tedstruk

    tedstruk

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    Jan 7, 2012
    OBs

    Observations... don't take me seriously, unless you want to listen to a lecture for an hour or so, then maybe you'll listen. Experience tells me to large of a resistor and the light doesn't light. by the way, how many amps in a 9v battery?:confused:
     
  7. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    none .... one of those small rectangular 9V batteries can supply ~ 300 - 400mA for a while

    they are not designed for hi current usage

    Dave
     
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Either you misunderstand your instructor, or you need to find a new one...

    Certainly, a 240V 100W incandescent bulb draws just over 400mA, and a 10W LED draws perhaps 700mA which is higher. HOWEVER the 10W LED drops close to 12V at this current.

    Power is vitally important. 10W is much less than 100W.
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Oh, and the vital difference is that you don't run a 12V LED from 240V using a resistor to drop the other 216 volts!
     
  10. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    yeah, .... you beat to a response to his comments there Steve

    Dave
     
  11. donkey

    donkey

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    Feb 26, 2011
    uhm dumb question here steve.... why would he drop 216volts and not 228?
     
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    because my math is very poor.

    Actually the answer is closer to 327 volts (for a 240 VAC RMS mains)
     
  13. donkey

    donkey

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    Feb 26, 2011
    ok now I may have to start another topic just to figure out how you got that figure.... I still have issues with AC stuff thats why I like dc its pretty straight forward lol
     
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