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LED brakeLight Project - need Help!

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by [email protected], Apr 13, 2007.

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  1. Guest

    Ok - is there any place I can get a tutorial on how to make my own LED
    brake light?
    At the moment I'm dreaming big and it would have 8 circuts and do fun
    things while in running mode and have the flashing/solid attention
    getting brake.
    This is NOT for an on road app and I want it to be able to react to
    speedometer input.
    I saw a few other post here on LED controllers.
    Is there a better place to ask?
    Thanks
     
  2. default

    default Guest

    Accelerometer with a G meter in the cab and brake light that responds
    to deceleration?
     
  3. Grey

    Grey Guest


    My first thoughts would be...

    Speedo pickup with an output frequency related to speed.

    A frequency to voltage converter.

    A A/D circuit to create a value in relation to speed

    A PIC controller (some already have the A/D facility) and a bit of program
    which will look for sharp decrease in speed and output an LED(s).


    Graham
     
  4. If you use a PIC, then you can dispense with the freq-volt convertor and A/D
    and receive input straight from the vehicle's speed sensor. I alwayas
    thought brake lights should give some indication of how hard you are
    pressing the pedal. An accelerometer module from www.sparkfun.com would
    make that quite possible.
     
  5. Do you mean a "third" brake light, such as in the rear window of an
    automobile?
    In what way do you want to react?
    Probably not. :) Do you know anything about programming? If so, you may
    wish to investigate using microcontrollers like a Basic Stamp, Picaxe, PIC,
    AVR, MSP430, 8052, or ??? Depending upon the complexity of "fun things", a
    microcontroller may be the best route to go. OTOH, if you just want to make
    simple patterns, then there may be simpler ways than having to tackle the
    learning curve of a microcontroller. Of course, you only have to conquer
    that once. After that, you will wonder how you got along without them.
    Crack for engineers I guess. ;-)
     
  6. Guest

    Thank you all - you have popinted me in some good directions
    "Basic Stamp, Picaxe, PIC, AVR, MSP430, 8052..."
    I have been thinking about a micro controller. I have done some
    programing and want to learn more. I lear best when I have an actual
    reason to lear.
    Due to all of your help here I have been reading more about Picaxe.
    What would be best? Basic Stamp, Picaxe, PIC, AVR, MSP430, 8052

    I'm looking to controll up to 16 circutes to controll superbright
    LEDs. 12vdc. The basic running vs brake voltage is 6vdc vs 12vdc. I
    want some various running light modes such as roatation based on
    speed.
    I have yet to find out what the snowmobile's Speedo's output is.
    (Speedo = Speedometer NOT Some old guy wearing a Speedo! ;) I would
    think it is either pulse width or variable voltage. Since the
    snowmobile has a (too) comples onboard computer I would think it is
    pulse width.
    I'm now off to see if there are any news groups for
    microcontrollers. Looks to me like Picaxe might be the most
    helpful...?

    Thanks all!
     
  7. What kind of programming have you done? The BASIC Stamp is probably the
    easiest of the lot to get going on, but it is also going to be the slowest
    and least flexible. It's not bad, just BASIC. ;-)
    You could do this with regular logic chips like a "decade counter". A hand
    full of diodes would let you turn the LEDs all on at once. Of course you
    could simlify the circuitry and have allot more fun with a microcontroller.
    Pulse rate is another likely possibility.
    Nothing wrong with this group for that. I haven't actually used a Picaxe,
    but I hear good things about them.
     
  8. Randy Day

    Randy Day Guest

    Heh. That's like asking "What's the best automobile?"
    You'll get all kinds of answers.

    They'll all flash LED's (dunno about the superbrites),
    so it probably comes down to your preference for
    programming environments. And cost, of course. ;)
     
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