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Laser Tag Gun - Short burst circuit

Discussion in 'LEDs and Optoelectronics' started by _Nate_, Jun 12, 2017.

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  1. _Nate_

    _Nate_

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    Jun 12, 2017
    Hello! So recently I've been designing laser tag guns, but I am a little confused on the circuit. I need a simple circuit that allows one trigger pull/switch press to flash the laser diode for just a split second to prevent players from holding down the trigger. Anyone have any ideas? Thanks!
     
  2. _Nate_

    _Nate_

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    Jun 12, 2017
    Edit: I'm trying to design a switch that automatically shuts off when it turns on so it's just a burst. If anyone has ideas, that would be appreciated.
     
  3. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Lots of them. Do you have any information?"

    al
     
  4. _Nate_

    _Nate_

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    Jun 12, 2017
    Information?
     
  5. _Nate_

    _Nate_

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    Jun 12, 2017
    I want a momentary switch to put behind the trigger so that the laser diode activates but immediately turns off to simulate a shot.
     
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    you said you have "been designing" so we have to assume you have made a decent start ?

    have you got a circuit ? or were you expecting some one here to do it all for you ?
     
  7. _Nate_

    _Nate_

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    Jun 12, 2017
    I designed the gun models (as in 3D plastic cases) and gathered materials.
     
  8. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Power source
    Voltage
    Available current
    Current needed by the load
    Physical size available
    Quantity

    A mechanical switch that makes contact for only a brief period of time when its button is pushed and held down is possible, but the E in EP stands for electronics. A circuit that takes a momentary or stationary input switch button press) and turns it into an electrical signal (pulse) of a consistent, fixed time period (pulse width) is called a monostable multivibrator, or just monostable for short.

    If you are sure that the switch press *always* will be longer than the desired output pulse, the circuit gets pretty simple, a differentiator plus an output driver.

    If the input might be longer or shorter than the output, then you need a true monostable, something that has feedback and control gating. Again, simple circuits, but dependent on the details.

    ak
     
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