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Laptop Power Jack

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by Spherix, Sep 24, 2016.

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  1. Spherix

    Spherix

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    Sep 24, 2016
    I apologize ahead if this post is in the wrong area.
    I did my homework and I know this specific model has issues with needing chargers, I found quite a few similar issues.
    The laptop is a Gateway MD2614u
    Let me start by saying this laptop used to eat chargers, they always seemed to run too hot and after a while stopped working... After sending the laptop to gateway to be repaired and getting yet another charger (3rd one) I called and complained a bit more. Their solution was to replace or rather in their words "Re solder" the power jack I don't actually know if they replaced it. The issue wasn't fixed and the warranty had expired.
    So the laptop has been sitting around for a couple years now I decided to open it up for myself.
    Charger Port.jpg
    This looks like corrosion ? I know this area on the laptop always seems incredibly hot. I'm really just wondering if the presence of this points to a specific fault with the jack itself ? Any help would be amazing.
     
  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Corrosion on the framework, probably something spilled on it (coffee, softdrink) but jack looks ok.
     
    HellasTechn and davenn like this.
  3. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    I have a suggestion for you.

    The fact that the PSU get hot and eventually die, tells me that the laptop is driving them to their limits.

    Check your laptop's power requirements (voltage and amperage) and buy a PSU of the same voltage but larger Amperage. Then remove the cable connecting the old PSU to the laptop and solder it in place of the new PSU taking extra care to correct polarity (unless if the new PSU has the same jack and can fit your laptop).

    A universal adapter may also be a good idea (of same voltage but larger Amperage).

    In other words a stronger PSU will most probably not bet hot and will last.
     
  4. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    Apr 14, 2013
    If the power jack is bad or solder joints are cold or broken i guess you would be also experienceing blackouts (without battery on) or charging problems (with battery on).
     
  5. Spherix

    Spherix

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    Sep 24, 2016
    I totally left it out of the post, but in order to get it to take power I have to fiddle with the connection for a bit and if I move it, it stops charging. This issue seems separate from the main issue as it started after they "fixed" the power jack.
     
  6. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    Apr 14, 2013
    It could be related with the other PSU's burning but you first have to make sure if the laptop's side is failing or if you have a damaged jack or wire.

    I do reccomend that you get a more powerful PSU though.
     
  7. Spherix

    Spherix

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    Sep 24, 2016
    I ordered a new jack, was only 5$ USD. The current PSU is 19Volts 3.42 Amps, can you give me a recommendation on how high I should go ? I don't want to over do it.
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    19V 4 to 5 Amp

    Looking closely at the centre pin of the socket, in you OP pic, it looks as tho there is little solder on it. This may be causing a high resistance joint, and that will heat up
    Would be interesting to see what the soldering looked like on the other side of the board


    Dave
     
  9. HellasTechn

    HellasTechn

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    Apr 14, 2013
    I agree. something close to 5 amps would be just fine.

    Same here !
     
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Actually, if the problem is a high resistance connection it could also explain the charger running hot.

    The laptop almost certainly contained a number of switch mode regulators and they will respond to the voltage drop across the faulty joint by demanding more current.

    It might be a "one stone, two birds" type of problem
     
    davenn likes this.
  11. Spherix

    Spherix

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    Sep 24, 2016
    Thank you for the help, I took a picture of the solder on the bottom of the power jack to satisfy your curiosity.
    Flip Side.jpg
    The jack's bottom pins are circled
     
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    It looks like all the current is likely to be carried through the plating on that hole. Its a pretty big hole, so its probably OK, but if I were mine I'd do a proper job soldering the top.

    How good are you at soldering?

    Also, I said the bottom looks OK, but since the connection doesn't protrude its impossible to say if it really is OK. I would normally expect to see solder flowing through to the other side of the board. However, inner layers can suck the heat out, so that's not a definite indication it's bad either.

    If you have a 4 wire low ohms meter, I'd encourage you to measure the resistance between the pin and the ground plane. However I hold no great hope you have one, and even if you did, measuring in this case would be tricky.
     
  13. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    yup, that was my thought as well when I could see both sides. The initial top side is pretty much totally devoid of solder
     
  14. KJ6EAD

    KJ6EAD

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    All of the solder joints in that corner of the board look poor, but that may just be due to flux residue and lead-free solder. In production, high thermal mass devices and ones with a lot of sinking such as metal connectors are barely wetted in the reflow process that's profiled to favor the high value processors. This, in conjunction with mechanical stress often results in a flaky connection and arcing in an annular ring fracture of the solder. Removing the old solder and replacing it using additional flux and a long enough dwell to wet through the barrel and reconnect any broken mid-layer grounds will produce the best result but requires good technique and a preheater.
     
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