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Is this device possible to make?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by GreenXenon, May 8, 2009.

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  1. GreenXenon

    GreenXenon Guest

    Hi:

    Does a device that performs the following conversions and modulations
    exist? If not, is it possible to construct?

    Prior to being superimposed on a carrier wave, a modulator signal has
    its alternating-current converted to direct-current of the same
    frequency, amperage, voltage, and wattage.

    What I mean by this is that before this AC-to-DC conversion, if
    graphed, the current will be seen going up from the x-axis [zero] to
    its peak, then down to x-axis, then below the x-axis to its negative
    peak, then back up to the x-axis. Both the positive and negative peaks
    are of equal distant from the x-axis. This is an AC cycle.

    After AC-DC conversion, if graphed the current goes from the x-axis to
    it’s peak, then down to the x-axis, then back up to it’s peak and then
    down to the x-axis again. As you can see, there is no longer any
    negative polarity. It goes from 0 to peak to 0 repeats. This is a DC
    cycle. Once again, both peaks are equally distant from the x-axis.

    After this is when the modulation occurs.

    During modulation, the carrier wave [also a DC current because it
    never goes below the x-axis] is affected by the modulator wave. The
    carrier’s base frequency is zero Hz and its base amplitude is zero
    watts-per-square-meter.

    Base = without modulation

    When the modulator signal’s frequency increases, the peak-to-peak
    amplitude of the carrier signal increases equivalent to the following
    manner: In numbers, the peak-to-peak amplitude [in watts-per-square-
    meter] of the carrier signal equates to the frequency of the modulator
    signal [Hz]

    When the modulator signal’s frequency decreases, the peak-to-peak
    amplitude of the carrier signal decreases equivalent to the following
    manner: In numbers, the peak-to-peak amplitude [in watts-per-square-
    meter] of the carrier signal equates to the frequency of the modulator
    signal [Hz]

    When the modulator signal’s peak-to-peak amplitude increases, the
    carrier’s frequency increases such that – in numbers – the frequency
    of the carrier wave [in Hz] equates to the amplitude [in watts-per-
    square-meter] of the modulator wave.

    When the modulator signal’s peak-to-peak amplitude decreases, the
    carrier’s frequency decreases such that – in numbers – the frequency
    of the carrier wave [in Hz] equates to the amplitude [in watts-per-
    square-meter] of the modulator wave.

    During demodulation:
    When the carrier signal’s frequency increases, the peak-to-peak
    amplitude of the demodulated modulator signal increases equivalent to
    the following manner: In numbers, the peak-to-peak amplitude [in watts-
    per-square-meter] of the demodulated modulator signal equates to the
    frequency of the carrier signal [Hz].

    When the carrier signal’s frequency decreases, the peak-to-peak
    amplitude of the demodulated modulator signal decreases equivalent to
    the following manner: In numbers, the peak-to-peak amplitude [in watts-
    per-square-meter] of the demodulated modulator signal equates to the
    frequency of the carrier signal [Hz].

    When the carrier signal’s peak-to-peak amplitude increases, the
    demodulated modulator signal’s frequency increases such that – in
    numbers – the frequency of the demodulated modulator wave [in Hz]
    equates to the amplitude [in watts-per-square-meter] of the carrier
    wave

    When the carrier signal’s peak-to-peak amplitude decreases, the
    demodulated modulator signal’s frequency decreases such that – in
    numbers – the frequency of the demodulated modulator wave [in Hz]
    equates to the amplitude [in watts-per-square-meter] of the carrier
    wave


    Thanks
     
  2. Guest

    Congratulations. It appears you've discovered 'radio'. Available
    wherever fine electronics is sold.

     
  3. J.A. Legris

    J.A. Legris Guest

    You appear to be describing voltage-to-frequency conversion (V2F) and
    its inverse, frequency-to-voltage conversion (F2V). Your modulator
    seems to perform both functions simultaneously - the frequency and
    amplitude of an input signal are encoded as the amplitude and
    frequency (respectively) of an output signal. The demodulator is just
    the opposite, which you might achieve by just exchanging the
    connections to a second "modulator".

    There are many ways to do this in practice. Why do you ask?
     
  4. Guest

    Since direct current by defintion has no frequency, what you're asking
    for is not just impossible, the question makes no sense.
     
  5. GreenXenon

    GreenXenon Guest

    I think this device would be useful in generating a higher frequency
    signal from a bunch of lower frequency signals.

    For example, achieving a 10 Hz signal from ten 1 Hz signals.
     
  6. ^^ are. The word "electronics" is a plural
    noun.

    Hope This Helps! ;-)
    Rich
     
  7. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    THey call that a V TO F, F to V,. V = Voltage, Frequency.

    what you described is a Frequency to Voltage, and Back to
    Voltage to Frequency..

    Both exist in the industrial world for doing things like converting
    encoder signals to analog and the other way.

    In the basic electronics, there are various ways to accomplish this.

    One common method is to use a PLL circuit.
    etc...

    Or did I miss understand that long tail?

    http://webpages.charter.net/jamie_5"
     
  8. John Nagle

    John Nagle Guest

    I think you're describing a voltage-controlled oscillator.
    See "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voltage-controlled_oscillator"
    Read that and then come back.

    John Nagle
     
  9. Guest


    Is Green Xenon an allotrope like Red Phosphorus, Gray Selenium, Yellow
    Antimony and Black Arsenic?

    Michael
     
  10. Sjouke Burry

    Sjouke Burry Guest

    Nah more like luminous shit, or radiant vomit, or manure lightning....
     
  11. Greegor

    Greegor Guest

    No, it's full wave rectified AC.
    It takes only 4 diodes, or a center tapped transformer output and 2
    diodes.
    Not a frequency.
    Pointless when frequency and power are zero.
    stratu > Congratulations. It appears you've discovered
    stratu > 'radio'. Available wherever fine electronics is sold.

    LOL
     
  12. Guest


    LOL!

    Digester Sludge, Anaerobic Methane?

    M
     
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