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Is this a cell site?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by KILOWATT, Jan 11, 2005.

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  1. KILOWATT

    KILOWATT Guest

  2. Guest

    It looks like a cell site.

    My friend actually is one of the guys that goes in and wires up new
    equipment and services to the cell towers. From what I've gathered,
    cells sites have many different services (Verizon, Tmobile, etc) at
    each site, and they all lease/rent/buy space on a tower. There's a T1
    line going into each one, and at the base is equipment racks to bring
    in the provider's hardware.

    Dave
     
  3. Ross Mac

    Ross Mac Guest

    Yes it is....except here in Florida they are either crooked or
    sideways.....Ross
     
  4. Joel Kolstad

    Joel Kolstad Guest

    Yes, it's a cell site. It's the pretty standard 'three sector' arrangement:
    There are three 'sets' of antennas, each covering 120 degrees. In each set
    there are usually three antennas: Two that receive (the signals are combined
    in a form of diversity reception), and one that transmits. It appears that
    your tower has the transmit antennas below the receive antennas, but I
    couldn't really say for sure.

    You can also see a couple of covered microwave dish antennas that are
    probably being used for site to site (point to point) links to other small
    cell sites, a large hilltop repeater, etc.
    Typically, yes -- one company will build a tower, and the other carriers
    will rent space of the unused space on it. On the other hand, I've seen
    cases where you have 2 or 3 towers within a few hundred feet of one another
    because the companies apparently couldn't come to a leasing agreement!
    Some of the cell phone companies have maps of their tower locations -- some
    even with pictures! Sprint's is here:
    http://www.sprint.com/pcsbusiness/coverage/towermaps.html

    ---Joel Kolstad
     
  5. Guest

    <SNIP>

    That would make more sense then vice-versa, correct? The received
    signal is coming from your low-power cell phone, and you'd want a good
    line-of-sight in order to overcome any transmission power shortcomings.

    However, you can transmit from the tower at a much higher power than
    your cell phone can, so you're not as worried about being lower and can
    overcome minor LOS shortcomings with brute power, which you can't do
    with a cell phone.

    Dave
     
  6. KILOWATT

    KILOWATT Guest

    Thanks to all to read me and for the informative replies. Was appreciated.
    I'm looking forward for more replies.

    --
    Alain(alias:Kilowatt)
    Montréal Québec
    PS: 1000 excuses for errors or omissions,
    i'm a "pure" french canadian! :)
    Come to visit me at: http://kilowatt.camarades.com
    (If replying also by e-mail, remove
    "no spam" from the adress.)
     
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