Connect with us

Is solder really dangerous?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Young, Oct 4, 2013.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Young

    Young

    47
    0
    Feb 6, 2013
    A few days ago i read about lead poisoning,lead poisoning has a lot of effects on the body,from what i read it could cause fertility problems,memory problems etc,and i also learnt that one can get lead poisoning from soldering lead which is an alloy made of lead and other element,this almost made me loose interest in electronic because without lead there is no electronic,there isnt even any alternative to using soldering lead,plus i love soldering,soldering is even what makes electronics fun for me..from my research i learnt one can get lead poisoning from inhaling the fumes or injesting solder,and no amount is too small to cause problem is this really true,and if its not true or partially true please i need more evidence...
     
  2. icor1031

    icor1031

    65
    0
    Apr 27, 2010
    I believe it takes a decent amount of lead exposure to get lead poisoning. Search the web to find out how much is required. If you're really worried, just get good ventilation.

    If you're completely paranoid, use a dual cartridge respirator (lol) and gloves. But those won't stop you from ingesting it. ;)

    Also, you should work on your spelling/grammar....
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2013
  3. Young

    Young

    47
    0
    Feb 6, 2013
    please can you point out my grammar and spellng error
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,676
    1,892
    Sep 5, 2009
    for a start, there's no individual sentences. Its just one VERY LONG drawn out multiple lines of words. There's no gaps between comma's and the next word. There isn't a full stop anywhere
    I, when referring to yourself should be a capital letter ... " I " not " i "


    As far as soldering goes .... icor1031, covered your extreme paranoia pretty well
    and as he gave you a link there to lead free solder you should read it. It IS today's alternative that you didn't think existed.
    For home hobby electronic, tin/lead solder will probably be around for a good few more years. Just don't breathe in lots of fumes, use an extractor fan to suck the fumes away from the work area.

    There is a relatively new ... several years ago, standard on electronics manufacturing
    that comes under the RoHS cover Restriction of Hazardous Substances. It calls for all new electronics to be lead free. This includes the components construction as well as the soldering

    cheers
    Dave
     
  5. icor1031

    icor1031

    65
    0
    Apr 27, 2010
    Learnt should be learned.
    Loose should be lose.
    Injesting should be ingesting.
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,419
    2,790
    Jan 21, 2010
    That's a summary of most of it.

    I encourage you too google "ROHS" and "Lead-free solder".

    Lead free solder is harder to work with, but if you're concerned about lead poisoning, it is the way to go.

    Incidentally the flux fumes can be a real problem too. It is a good idea to ensure you have some airflow over where you are working so that you don't inhale it either.
     
  7. Young

    Young

    47
    0
    Feb 6, 2013
    Thank's for your correction, i didn't know i could get english and electronics knowledge here, i've heard about lead free solder i just forgot to include it, from what i learned lead free solder is not as good as lead solder and it has a higher melting point, well thank's now i know lead is really dangerous and i have to stay away from it as far as possible.Once again thanks for the english and electronics lecture, please if there is a mispelling or mistake in any of the words or sentences above correct me, no body is above correction.PEACE
     
  8. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
    769
    Jan 9, 2011
    Make sure you wash your hands thoroughly after handling solder. I keep my reel of solder in a plastic bag with a little hole with the solder coming through. Thus I do not handle the reel.

    Dats wot i finc.
     
  9. GreenGiant

    GreenGiant

    842
    6
    Feb 9, 2012
    Lead Free Solder does generally have a slightly higher melting point, but most soldering irons won't have any issues with melting it.
    On the other hand my father has been using leaded solder for the better part of 30 years and has no real health issues, definitely nothing caused by the lead.

    But if it is a legitimate concern you can get one of these and keep it right next to where you would solder, this would prevent the majority of the fumes from reaching you.
     
  10. Young

    Young

    47
    0
    Feb 6, 2013
    Thank you very much duke37. What you said is what i've been thinking.I mean i see alot of people soldering but have not health problems.For example the guy who repairs my playstation 2 solders in a room with little ventilation and still he is healthy.I heard lead makes 40% of solder, and people I heard have lead poison consumed real lead(lead that has just been extracted).Anyway thanks for your contribution God bless.
     
  11. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
    769
    Jan 9, 2011
    It is resonable to take precautions even if you know someone who manages to survive. I think the flux fumes are nasty.
    Electronic solder is 60% tin/40% lead. Plumbers solder is 60% lead/40% tin, plenty of room for confusion here. Plumbers used to have lead poisoning because they would wipe joints in pipes and cables and then eat their sandwiches, bait or snap without washing.
    Solder for water pipes must now be lead free.

    The current electronic solder is almost pure tin with perhaps a dash of silver.
    Tin melts at 232C, eutectic tin/lead melts at 190C.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-