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Is my setup 'earthed'? I live in Canada and have a UK machine.

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by Tonya, Jan 15, 2019.

  1. Tonya

    Tonya

    8
    0
    Jan 8, 2019
    I live in Canada. I have a "made in Britain" machine that I bought from the UK, that I want to use here in Canada. To do so, I bought a step-up/step-down voltage converter, though I don't know if it contains an internal regulator. Some voltage transformers contain an internal regulator, though these are more popular in 3rd-world countries or very remote areas of 1st-world countries where the power supply isn't as stable, I've heard. Should I trash mine and buy a more expensive one that contains an internal regulator, such as one from http://www.voltagesuperstore.com/voltage-converters/110-220-volts-converter-5.html ? If I can't find a 3-pin plug adapter (that will touch the two thin flat earthing contacts on the plug of my transformer, then would having an internal regulator allow me to use a 2-pin plug that goes into my wall outlet/mains supply? I am most concerned about how only 2-pins are entering my wall-outlet, and that there is no metal on that thing that is touching those thin flat metal contacts, as you can see in the photos I've taken near my wall outlet/mains supply.

    What are the risks of using the setup that I have right now? Could my machine get damaged since I suspect it isn't "earthed"? Or would I just get electrocuted myself, but my machines would stay safe?

    I tried looking on eBay for a wall adapter that would touch those flat thin metal contacts, and also have 3 pins that enter my wall, but I didn't find any (not that I spent much time looking). Can you please give me some links to where I can buy such an adapter, on eBay or elsewhere?

    Please look at the 9 photos I've most recently uploaded here: http://anannymouse.imgur.com/all/
    Please let me know if you're unable to see the 9 photos. It's important to me that you look at them.


    The paper wrapper that was around the Sterex power plug (that would plug into a wall if I was living in the UK, I would assume) says,


    "IMPORTANT:


    The wires in a 3 core main lead are coloured in accordance with the following code:


    Green & Yellow - Earth

    Blue - Neutral

    Brown - Live


    As the colours of the wires in the mains lead of this appliance may not correspond with the coloured markings identifying the terminals in your plug, proceed as follows:


    The wire which is coloured Green and Yellow must be connected to the terminals in the plug which is marked with the letter - E - or by the earth symbol, or coloured Green or Green & Yellow.



    The wire which is coloured Blue must be connected to the terminal which is marked with the letter - N - or coloured Black.


    The wire which is coloured Brown must be connected to the terminal which is marked with the letter - L - or coloured Red."


    "FLEXIBLE CORD WIRING LABEL


    If the socket outlets in the home are not suitable for the plug supplied with this appliance it should be cut off and an appropriate three pin plug fitted.


    NOTE: The plug severed from the lead must be destroyed, as a plug with bared flexible cord is hazardous if engaged in a live socket outlet.


    Only use a fuse that is approved to BS1362.


    The fuse rating is given in the appliance instructions. Only the rating indicated must be used.


    Always replace the fuse cover. Never use the plug with the fuse cover omitted.


    WARNING: THIS APPLIANCE MUST BE EARTHED.


    APPROVED BY BSI LICENCE NUMBER KM 10807"
     
  2. duke37

    duke37

    5,189
    704
    Jan 9, 2011
    You must have an earth for this appliance, A regulated supply should not be necessary unless you are in the sticks.

    To get an earth you MUST have three terminals. Adaptors to supply anerican devices from UK sockets are avalable in the UK. Presumably the opposite way round is available in Canada.

    Note that UK appliances will be designed for 230V and 50Hz. Is the device compatable? What is it, does it have a mains driven synchronous clock?
     
  3. Minder

    Minder

    2,801
    583
    Apr 24, 2015
    What is the nature of the equipment? Type? Wattage?
    You can possibly obtain a 120v/240v transformer from a local electrical supplier.
    In Canada/N.A. You have the choice of using 120v or 240vac for which you have two live conductors L1,L2 (240) instead of L1 and Gnd in UK.
    But you can simply connect the UK Neut to either L1 or L2, you also must use the earth GND..
    M.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2019
  4. Tonya

    Tonya

    8
    0
    Jan 8, 2019
    Because nobody gave any links or posted photos of what I'm supposed to order, I have no idea what you're talking about; what you are writing about sounds like Greek to me, so I went to a store that specializes in foreign electronics, and the attendant told me that my setup wasn't grounded. He also sold me a different step-up/step-down voltage converter, because mine wasn't CSA approved. My new one is CSA-approved. The two generalist electronics hobbyist shops I went to prior did not tell me any of these things, and sold me non-earthed stuff. :eek::mad:

    But now I think it should be earthed, because before I even mentioned to him that I had concerns about my old converter not being earthed, he freaked out when he saw it and exclaimed, "That's not grounded!!!".
     
  5. duke37

    duke37

    5,189
    704
    Jan 9, 2011
    But you have not posted links or photos of what you want to power.

    The UK supply is 230V +10% -6% i.e. 216.2V to 253V at 50Hz. My supply normally sits about 240V which was the old standard.
    You should be able to get something close in Canada. The Canadian 60Hz should not be a problem unless the the mains is used for timing. Induction motors will run faster.

    Equipment can need an earth or, if double insulated, can be run without an earth. The instructions say that an earth is necessary, so fit one for your own safety. Always use an earth leakage circuit breaker.

    There are all sorts of voltage convertors, as Minder says, a simple transformer will probably do. Convertors to take any reasonable supply and output pure sine wave at your voltage and frequency will cost the earth.:)

    American equipment inteded to run on 120V works very well on 240V for about 10 seconds.:D
     
  6. Minder

    Minder

    2,801
    583
    Apr 24, 2015
    No one knows the extent of your ability when you come here asking for help, so it is very easy to ask for clarification if not perfectly clear on the info that those here offer in order to help you.
    M.
     
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