Connect with us

Is Coax-Digital Usually [email protected]!#??

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by nilo, Jun 19, 2006.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. nilo

    nilo Guest

    Hi All,

    I have a question relating to plugging my PC into my new 7.1 Amplifier.

    To get to the point, the Coaxial lead coming out of the back of my PC's
    sound card digital out(builtin Nvidia Nforce1) gives me a small shock
    while holding the end of it (the metal bit) and touching any electronic
    equipments metal surface at the same time (yeh i know don't touch it)

    When plugging-in , unplugging into the amp I got a small shock.
    Naturally I suppose all electrical leads have power but this seems
    unusual.
    My question is: Is this normal? I've never known Analog style RCA Red &
    White leads to supply enough energy to shock someone (even minimally).
    I wouldn't want to hold it for more than a second...

    This is a new amplifier and although I'd love to continue to use my
    computers' 5.1 Coax Out, I'm not too keen if it isn't safe. When i
    received this shock, the Set-Top-Box I have connected to the Amp turned
    off! , or at least the TV output went black.. ohoh.. I was worried. I
    simply
    reset the STB, all good.

    It doesn't seem to be related to the Amp or the Coax Rca style lead i'm
    using... Is my computer healthy?

    Thanks to anyone who has any idea what is going on here! :D
     
  2. Just as a guess, throw out your "surge protector" it's starting
    to "leak". Replace it with a good one, like an ISO-BAR.

    Geoff.
     
  3. nilo

    nilo Guest

    Ohoh , I don't have a surge protecter per se...(at the fuse box)
    My PC is however plugged into a powerboard that does have written on it
    'surge protector' but I have heard somewhere on my travels that it
    really doesn't mean anything on cheap powerboards...
    Is there an ISO-BAR site???
    cheers
     
  4. Guest

    There's a good chance this could be due to a ground loop issue. Do you
    hear a hum on any analog inputs once the computer is hooked up? If so,
    that would point to a ground loop. Here's a page with some info to help
    you:
    http://www.epanorama.net/documents/groundloop/antenna_isolator_building.html
    It's a fairly common problem, and one that I've had as well. Good luck!
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-