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is 60 mhz oscilloscope good enough to repair motherboard?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by fixpc, Apr 26, 2006.

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  1. fixpc

    fixpc Guest

    please enlighten me !

    thanks in advance.
     
  2. Mr Fixit

    Mr Fixit Guest

    if you need to ask the question I wonder if you have the knowledge to repair
    a motherboard with one anyway
    as prodding various point with a scope is meaningless
     
  3. fixpc

    fixpc Guest

    I have fixed many many PC even without a scope than you could think of.
     
  4. Simon Scott

    Simon Scott Guest

    You assume that he is going to use it to repair motherboards. He may want it
    so he can learn to use it to repair motherboards.

    Why is everyone so quick to judge?
     
  5. fixpc

    fixpc Guest

    is it fast enough to clock signal 487, 370 sockets, frame signal in A34 in
    PCI... signal near the NB and SB.....etc.
    signal such as in AGP ( the 3rd pin counting backward).....etc.
     
  6. Mr Fixit

    Mr Fixit Guest

    its more of how can you repair a fast digital computer with a simple scope,
    measuring one or two points at any time is more or less useless
     
  7. fixpc

    fixpc Guest

    how about 100 mhz or 150 mhz, I cannot afford to buy expensive scope?
     
  8. Gerard Bok

    Gerard Bok Guest

    What's your aim?
    Doing $100 repairs on a $69 motherboard ?
     
  9. GregS

    GregS Guest

    I think you need a really really high megs scope to do anything these days.

    It does remind me of all us who were computer techs in the late 60's, like using a 10 Mhz
    non storage scope working at DEC up in Maynard on PDP-8 stuff. A computer
    tech always carried his scope wherever he went.

    greg
     
  10. A so often it depends. Depends on your skills, the type(s) of
    motherboard(s), the fault(s) and last but not least the answer you want to
    hear. In the old days of the 286 I had a 100mHz available for processor
    related problems. Best use I ever made of it was convincing a less
    experienced technician that sloppy edges caused extra pulses even in a
    device with Schmitt triggered inputs. He could/did not see it using a 25MHz
    oscope.

    petrus bitbyter
     
  11. Guest

    60MHz will be good enough to verify signals on about a 6 or 7 year old
    motherboard.
    All newer systems have signals that run as high as 533Mhz that you
    might want to check. In that case any modern motherboard repair if you
    are really serious about fixing them will require about a 1GHz scope
    and probe set.

    Then it will be good for just tracing signals and verifying that they
    are clean and of the appropriate level and expected frequency.
     
  12. Gerard Bok

    Gerard Bok Guest

    But in those days, they came with their own caddy :)

    Although quite often, just a --then common-- AM transistor radio
    proved just as handy :)

    (And you could listen to music while not in a computer room as
    well. Almost like a modern 'scope with internet interface today
    :)
     
  13. fixpc

    fixpc Guest

    now I understand more and the choice of oscilloscope!

    please show me url of a "Schmitt triggered inputs". TIA.
     
  14. fixpc

    fixpc Guest

    but I think a 60 mhz is not good enough , not until you have a frquency
    counter up 1-2 Ghz.

    what about this combination to unlock a breakdown motherboard.
     

  15. I was using a Tektronix 2465 4 channel 400 MHz scope seven years ago
    to troubleshoot computers.
     
  16. fixpc

    fixpc Guest

    in repair business, you may only require to know which component is not
    working, replace it and test it.

    I think tek 60 mhz is already good enought, I rasied this is draw your
    attention and good supporting point that my choice is wrong.
     
  17. I think tek 60 mhz is already good enought, I rasied this is draw your
    What?
     
  18. fixpc

    fixpc Guest

    what is what?
     
  19. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest


    Why would anyone bother to spend time repairing a motherboard? If it's
    something obvious like leaky caps then yeah, but otherwise new boards
    are dirt cheap.
     
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