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Interfacing microcontroller with +/- 10V?

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by Texton, Aug 14, 2012.

  1. Texton

    Texton

    14
    0
    Jul 27, 2012
    Hi guys.

    I have to design a interfaceboard for my microcontroller (PSoC5 - 3.3V). The interface board should have +/- 10V in/out and a minimum bandwidth at 48kHz.

    My plan for the output right now is to control mosfets with the microcontroller which opens and closes for the 10V.

    But before I begin to build and test anything, I wanted to see if you guys had some suggestions/tips?
     
  2. GreenGiant

    GreenGiant

    830
    5
    Feb 9, 2012
    I would go with mosfets or just regular NPN/PNP transistors if you don't need much current, they tend to be very fast and cheaper, but like I said they don't handle current well
     
  3. Texton

    Texton

    14
    0
    Jul 27, 2012
    What if I need current? (not that I necessarily do, but just for the knowledge)

    And what about input? :)
     
  4. GreenGiant

    GreenGiant

    830
    5
    Feb 9, 2012
    if you need current use the mosfets, though high speed (switching time less than 20us aka 48kHz) will cost you a pretty penny

    what do you mean about input?
    control to the fets? you can find them with control as low as 3.3 so the micro should be able to handle that
     
  5. zalmonox

    zalmonox

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    0
    Aug 19, 2012
    OK if you need little current <.8A use transisotrs, if you go higher in current use mosfets but be careful how you control them -- this might bite you if you handle negative voltage levels ... and if you need a lot of current you may consider using relays. You can find a lot of exampes here http://electroschematics.com/tag/audio-amplifier-circuits/

    best
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 19, 2012
  6. Texton

    Texton

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    0
    Jul 27, 2012
    Hi all. Thank you very much for your reply's, it was helpful :)
     
  7. dpenelob

    dpenelob

    15
    0
    Mar 27, 2013
    Addendum:
    If you would like to transmit digital data, e.g. just "on" and "off", you could
    use a MAX232. For analog signals, I would suggest a differential line driver
    for analog signals. Have a look at Linear Technology's products for a start, I suppose.
     
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