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instead of optocoupler?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by erikssonidingle, Nov 29, 2012.

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  1. erikssonidingle

    erikssonidingle

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    Nov 29, 2012
    I have a curcuit board on which an optocoupler exploded, my fault.
    I need to replace it.
    www.datasheetcatalog.org/datasheet/clare/CPC1943GS.pdf
    But I would like to replace it with something that will perform the same but take more punishment if possible.
    I live in sweden and no swedish electronics shops seem to be able to sell me one of theese, what can I replace it with?
    I dont see that it need to be a photoelectric component, but it helps if it has six legs that I can solder back into the holes in the circuitboard.
    I am totally alien to electronics and have no clue where to start.
    Help greatly appreciated.
     
  2. GreenGiant

    GreenGiant

    842
    6
    Feb 9, 2012
    its highly recommended to replace it with the exact same price, but if you are determined you can find an optocoupler that is rated for more voltage, they are fairly common.

    Unfortunately it would be difficult to find something that would work in place of the optocoupler that will fit in the same footprint on the board (Im assuming this is out of a PCB)
     
  3. erikssonidingle

    erikssonidingle

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    0
    Nov 29, 2012
    Thank you mr Giant. I will bite the dust and buy the same thing, again. Thank you for helping me.
     
  4. erikssonidingle

    erikssonidingle

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    Nov 29, 2012
    How do I mark this as "solved?"
     
  5. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,500
    2,840
    Jan 21, 2010
    You post:

    "Thanks, that fixed it"

    :)
     
  6. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,271
    Nov 28, 2011
    Do you know how/why the optocoupler "exploded"? Was it because of excessive voltage across the isolation barrier, or excessive current into the LEDs, or something else?

    If it was caused by overvoltage across the barrier, I'd suggest (as GreenGiant did) that you use a device with a higher voltage specification and/or more safety agency qualifications.

    If it's due to overcurrent in the LED(s), you can add protection to the circuit to prevent it from happening again.

    If it was something else... something else might be able to be done :)
     
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