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Inspection Tools?

Discussion in 'Security Alarms' started by JW, Mar 30, 2006.

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  1. JW

    JW Guest

    Have any of you found any good tools/tips for inspections/tests that make
    the job more efficient or easier? Do you use any with telescoping poles?

    Do you have universal sensitivity testers? If not, does it cause an issue
    for your customers?

    Thanks for sharing!
     
  2. Crash Gordon

    Crash Gordon Guest

    Inspections of what?



    | Have any of you found any good tools/tips for inspections/tests that make
    | the job more efficient or easier? Do you use any with telescoping poles?
    |
    | Do you have universal sensitivity testers? If not, does it cause an issue
    | for your customers?
    |
    | Thanks for sharing!
    |
    |
    |
    |
     
  3. JW

    JW Guest


    Alarm systems and related devices.... mostly fire alarm systems/devices.
     
  4. grabbitt

    grabbitt Guest

  5. Have any of you found any good tools/tips for inspections/tests
    Here are a few of my favorites in no particular order:

    + Dental mirror and penlight for viewing inside wall cavities.
    + Dental pick for grabbing wires from small openings, scratching foil bridges on
    circuit boards, etc.
    + Box of about 5 pounds of beaded chain which I bought at a garage sale for $5.
    When fishing wires from attic to basement in older homes I would often locate
    the wet wall (plumbing chase) where the DWV stack rises through the attic and
    drop one end of the chain along side the pipe. Due to its weight and
    flexibility, as I paid it out the chain would find its way to the basement
    through any available openings at each level below.
    + Tone set made by Progressive. Clip the tone generator's leads to any open
    circuit and you can trace wires behind walls from several feet away. This was
    great for deciphering unlabeled wiring during takeovers, completions of builder
    prewires, etc.
    + Butane soldering iron. No cord to knock over lamps and stuff. :)
    + Right-angle, cordless drill from Makita. When retrofitting ceiling speakers
    I'd cut out the opening, reach in with a shortened 3/4" paddle bit (Note to
    Olson: paddle bits are perfectly safe once you learn how to use a drill) and
    drill the top of the wall to drop my cables down.
    + Laptop computer for downloading panels. Great for diagnostics and reading
    logs on service calls as well as doing the initial configuration on new
    installations.
    I'm not aware of a universal sensitivity tester.
    Not that I've ever noticed. :^)

    --

    Regards,
    Robert L Bass

    Bass Burglar Alarms
    The Online DIY Store
    http://www.BassBurglarAlarms.com
     
  6. Frank Olson

    Frank Olson Guest


    One of my suppliers carries a small tube attachment that will fit over a
    can of smoke. It concentrates the smoke and usually only takes a single
    short "blast" to set off a detector. We've significantly increased
    the number of detectors we can test with canned smoke as a result.

    Extension rods are good for heat detectors. Some companies use the
    small butane soldering irons with the "heat" attachment. This
    eliminates the "open flame".

    Each manufacturer has their own smoke detector sensitivity testers.
    Instead of making a huge investment (some can cost as much as $6000.00
    and will only test one "family" of smokes) call some of your local
    "friendly" competitors. Find out which ones they have, and purchase one
    they don't (but need). Then you can talk about "sharing" or "pooling"
    the testers.

    For really high smokes there are extension kits, but whether you want to
    get them is up to you. If you do a lot of theatres, you might want to
    invest in one.

    Frank Olson
    http://www.yoursecuritysource.com
     
  7. JW

    JW Guest


    The only one I've ever heard of is the Gemini... and they're expensive.
     
  8. Tiscor http://www.tiscor.com/ and BuildingReports.com
    http://www.buildingreports.com/ use electronic gizmos to capture
    insepction and testing data.

    Gemini Scientific http://www.geminiscientific.com/ and SDI TruTest
    http://www.sdifire.com/trutest.html make universal sensitivity test
    instruments.

    Best regards,

    Mike

    --
    Michael B. Baker, SET
    Michael Baker & Associates, Inc.
    PO Box 737
    Gladstone, OR 97027-0737
    503-657-8888 v
    503-655-1014 f
    ET News(r) http://www.etnews.org
     
  9. Thats what an 8' 1/2" Pipe is for
     
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