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Infrared emitters and receivers

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Chickwolf, Apr 17, 2015.

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  1. Chickwolf

    Chickwolf

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    0
    Jan 3, 2014
    Hey guys, I recently picked up a number of IR emitters and receivers but am struggling to get the receivers to well, receive. I have gotten the emitters to emit signals but due to the only datasheet for the receivers I found being in Japanese I am unsure of the working voltages.

    What would a typical input voltage/current be for an IR receiver?

    Any help given would be greatly appreciated and if anyone needs more information then please ask away!
     
  2. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    Please share something with us.
    IR detectors come in a couple different flavours.

    Some simply act as a transistor, so a wide range of voltages is acceptable.
    Others have logic built in, and need to be powered.

    Send us a model/part number. Or at least a picture.
     
  3. Chickwolf

    Chickwolf

    36
    0
    Jan 3, 2014
    The model number of the receiver is "VS 1838B", I can post a picture as well if it would help?
     
  4. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
  5. Chickwolf

    Chickwolf

    36
    0
    Jan 3, 2014
    Everything works fine now, thank you for your help!
     
  6. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    That type of receiver responds only to IR pulsed at a specific frequency. In this case, 38KHz, which is a very common one.

    Connect 5V to pin 3, and ground pin 2. Pin 1 is the output. It will be high when no IR at 38KHz is detected, and low when it is.

    Rig up a '555 to flash you emitter at 38KHz (it would help if you have a frequency meter). And you can test it. If you don't have a frequency meter, use one of the 555 calculators to get the components values, then allow about 10% adjust on the resistor and adjust it until you see a response.

    I have some like this, and they are incredibly sensitive, they will respond to an emitter in the same room pointing in any direction.

    Edit: Okay, you got it working while I was posting. So I guess you already knew this?

    Bob
     
  7. shumifan50

    shumifan50

    569
    56
    Jan 16, 2014
    Just as an additional matter of interest: The IR transmitters typically have a very short range. This can be significantly increased (10-20M) by over-driving the transmitter and pulsing it to allow it to cool down between pulses. This is how normal appliance remote controls achieve range.
    You should also note that there several protocols for remotes which are well documented on the web. Do a google. The protocol is important to stop devices interfering with each other - most have a device number in the transmissions to link the transmitter and receiver uniquely.
     
  8. Chickwolf

    Chickwolf

    36
    0
    Jan 3, 2014
    I found the pin outs on the same site with the data sheet so was able to get it working with off of a 5v supply, thank you for the additional information though.

    Thanks as well shumifan50, will defiantly look into the protocols.
     
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