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Inductive sensor interference

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by snl_5000, Jun 14, 2016.

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  1. snl_5000

    snl_5000

    2
    0
    Jun 14, 2016
    Good afternoon,

    There is a noise, betwen 2 inductive proximity sensors, that are 90º each other. How can I reduce this noise?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Minder

    Minder

    3,182
    691
    Apr 24, 2015
    What type are they or a part No?
    There are shielded kind that have shielding right up to the end of the sensor.
    M.
     
    hevans1944 likes this.
  3. snl_5000

    snl_5000

    2
    0
    Jun 14, 2016
    I would like to know, how can I reduce the effects of magnetic field of one in the other. Remembering that are in 90º each other and the distance betwen the centers of faces is minor 10cm.

    Thanks.
     
  4. Minder

    Minder

    3,182
    691
    Apr 24, 2015
    It would help to know what kind we are talking about otherwise it is pure conjecture.
    Have you tried any kind of earth grounded shield of some kind, hard to advise without knowing details of the system.
    M.
     
  5. Kiwi

    Kiwi

    383
    99
    Jan 28, 2013
  6. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

    4,647
    2,169
    Jun 21, 2012
    Since inductive proximity sensors depend on a magnetic field for their operation, it will be difficult to "shield" one from the other even if they are mounted at right angles to each other. Please upload a photograph showing how these sensors are mounted and provide us with information as to what sensors you are using. Have you contacted the sensor manufacturer for their suggestions on how to use their sensors? What are you trying to DO?
     
  7. Minder

    Minder

    3,182
    691
    Apr 24, 2015
    There are industrial types that are shielded right to the end of the sensor.
    [​IMG]
    M.
     
  8. KJ6EAD

    KJ6EAD

    1,114
    159
    Aug 13, 2011
    I seem to remember reading in one sensor catalog that there was a method of pulsing the sensors alternately so that one is on while the other is off, essentially multiplexing, but it requires some control elements in addition to the sensors.
     
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