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Induction, #8 or something...

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Tim Williams, Feb 4, 2007.

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  1. Tim Williams

    Tim Williams Guest

    http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/Images/Induction803.jpg
    Overview (with captions, not that anyone here needs that much verbosity) of
    the line/high voltage/inverter side.

    http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/Images/Induction804.jpg
    Power supply (left: linear 12V supply and cheezy PP chopper for gate drives)
    and oscillator and feedback circuits (on breadboard). The breadboard is
    slowly getting male pattern baldness as I transfer circuits to print!

    http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/Images/Induction805.jpg
    Front view.

    http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/Images/Induction806sm.jpg
    Closeup of the inverter business.
    http://webpages.charter.net/dawill/Images/Induction806.jpg (318kb)

    Tim
     
  2. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    I've limited breakboard projects to about 30 connections.. After that,
    I make disposible PCB's that get all hacked up with changes.
    D from BC
     
  3. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    Ooops
    I mean breadboard...
    Must be getting high from all the chemicals I'm using on my PCB
    project. :)
    D from BC
     
  4. john jardine

    john jardine Guest

    You've put a lot of good work in there, don't think I'd ever have the
    patience.
    Saw a 75kW version in action last week on 2 pieces of 2" shafting. Switch on
    and a sec later the shaft ends were glowing white hot and welded!. Took 5
    seconds to quench with water.
    The 2.5MW unit was even more impressive. Looks like it had cornered the
    world's stock of transistors and Copper busbarring.
    john
     
  5. ehsjr

    ehsjr Guest

    Thanks - love to see updates on your project.

    How did you cut the copper? You've got better edges
    than what I've done. I've used copper roof flashing,
    cut it with metal snips - and got ragged edges, plus the
    copper curled.

    Ed
     
  6. Tim Williams

    Tim Williams Guest

    Exactly. ;)

    Careful use of snips, plus a hammer and flat metal surface to bang on, files
    and sandpaper got that work done. If it's too hard (I started with pipe,
    which is a harder temper), anneal it (torch to dark red heat). If it's not
    flat, flatten it. If it gets too hard again, anneal again.

    If you're always getting burrs and ragged edges, that sounds like you aren't
    continuing the cut at the root of where your last snip got.
    I never got good results with aviation snips, either.

    YMMV, but this was done with 0.042" (give or take a few thous) stock. A
    little heavy for hand work, but holds its shape and doesn't take too much
    force to work, between bending by hand to leveraging it into place with
    pliers and hammers.

    Tim
     
  7. Guest


    Nice... sure you don't want a bigger fan for your radiator?

    And the radiator is elevated a cm or so off the surface so the hot air
    can escape, yes?

    Michael
     
  8. Tim Williams

    Tim Williams Guest

    Yes, yes it is. :cool:

    I'll put some squirrel cages in cowling later. I have two blowers, removed
    from microwave ovens, that should blow reasonably. At the moment I get a
    comfortable temp rise at full power (dissipation under 1kW), this being at
    roughly 60°F ambient in the chilly basement.

    Presently I'm testing at 50V, probably less than 200W. After holding the
    thing at resonance for some time, the circulating water gets luke warm
    (without fan running).

    Tim
     

  9. Did you remove the squirrels, too?


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  10. Fred Bartoli

    Fred Bartoli Guest

    a écrit :
    A blowing fan will make your radiator much less efficient: the hotter
    the radiator the more it radiates.
     
  11. Tim Williams

    Tim Williams Guest

    "Fred Bartoli"
    Well, if you want to be perfectly pedantic, you'll have to realize that it
    is, in fact, an automotive air conditioning evaporator. Rather than
    radiating into its surroundings, it absorbed. ;)

    Tim
     
  12. Tim Williams

    Tim Williams Guest

    Tried, but the buggers are everywhere in this town. They'll just have to
    learn their lesson when I spin it up ;-)

    Tim
     
  13. Terry Given

    Terry Given Guest

    when I first moved to MA, my workmates thought I was mad as I spent my
    lunchbreaks feeding squirrels. they reckoned they were just rats with
    good PR.

    Cheers
    Terry
     

  14. I lost power to my business for half a day once, when one of the
    furry little bastards tried to climb down the insulator on one leg of a
    7200 volt three phase feed in the parking lot. It took out that phase
    for the north end of town while the power company drove around looking
    for another cause. I told them that I heard the buzz, and saw the flash
    when it exploded but was told a squirrel couldn't cause that big of a
    problem. Bones, fur and teeth were all over the parking lot. :(


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
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