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In what way toroidal cores are important for heavy transformer ?

Discussion in 'Electronics Homework Help' started by Samoa, Mar 12, 2020.

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  1. Samoa

    Samoa

    1
    0
    Mar 12, 2020
    Hi,

    Just a school assignment has been doing research on toroidal cores and electromagnetism. While looking for my answers this website just popup straight in between. BTW have been going through forum have found some great answers here. I would like to know in what way toroidal cores are important for heavy or any transformers? Share your thoughts.
     
  2. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

    2,967
    817
    May 12, 2015
    Toroidals can be 10% or more efficient than an E I (laminated) transformer.
    They can be smaller and still have The same output as a much heavier laminated transformer.
    The internet has a wealth of information. Have a very good read.

    Martin
     
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  3. Sanu

    Sanu

    9
    1
    Feb 14, 2020
    Hey there,
    Unlike other types of transformers, the toroidal transformer has an optimal design. Toroidal cores are made of electrical steel with a very low loss rate and high saturation induction by a magnetic coil transformer.
    Here is the answer you might look for https://nicoreindia.com/toroidal-cores-important-transformers/
     
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  4. WHONOES

    WHONOES

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    249
    May 20, 2017
    One very important advantage of Toroidal transformers is their very low (small) external field which makes them perfect for use in audio systems. I also find it easy to add extra windings to provide low current ±15V for control circuits obviating the need for another transformer.
     
  5. Minder

    Minder

    3,014
    640
    Apr 24, 2015
    I have preferred Toroidal's for mains transformers for some years now, mostly for the advantages already mentioned.
    Adding over-winds etc, usually around 2 turns/volt.
    One thing to watch for that some have made the mistake of doing is to make a cover or clamp to chassis secured by the centre mounting bolt.
    If the clamp or cover reaches the bottom of the chassis, this essentially creates a shorted turn and over heating results.
    M.
     
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