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Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by joshua, Feb 22, 2006.

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  1. joshua

    joshua Guest

    Hi All,
    what is the meaning of 24bit,16 bit in Analog to Digital converter.
    I think it is for resolution. I am not understood properrly any one
    help me.
    Kind Regards,
    Joshua
     
  2. Pooh Bear

    Pooh Bear Guest

    It is indeed resolution.

    For someone supposedly involved in electronic design you don't know
    very much do you ?

    Graham
     
  3. Bob Masta

    Bob Masta Guest

    A 16-bit converter has 2^16 possible states;
    a 24-bit converter has 2^24. But note that
    in the real world this difference is *very* hard to
    realize, due to the noise floor of typical analog
    circuits. That's because there are definite
    limits on how high the input voltage can be,
    so you have to try to resolve ever-lower voltages
    to increase resolution. With a 16-bit ADC having
    a 0-4.096 V input range, the resolution is 62.5 microvolts.
    With a 24-bit ADC covering the same range, the
    resolution is 0.244 microvolts. Not many circuits
    with noise that low!

    Best regards,




    Bob Masta
    dqatechATdaqartaDOTcom

    D A Q A R T A
    Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
    www.daqarta.com
    Home of DaqGen, the FREEWARE signal generator
     
  4. Chris

    Chris Guest

    Hi, Joshua. May I suggest that you find a tutor, and pay him to help
    you with your school project.

    You are in way over your head, and a newsgroup is not the appropriate
    place to get the kind of timely, intensive help you apparently need.
    This newsgroup is also not an appropriate place for homework questions.

    I'm sure you could either place a post on your school bulletin board,
    or advertise to find an upperclassman who is willing to be employed.

    Good luck
    Chris
     
  5. PeteS

    PeteS Guest

    To a certain extent I agree, yet the OP has chosen s.e.b. (rather than
    s.e.d. at least) and at least has asked a question (albeit not using
    particularly precise grammar ;) and perhaps even wishes to learn - who
    knows.

    I always thought s.e.b. might be the appropriate place for someone to
    ask a question on an electronics subject about which they have no
    knowledge, especially if they admit to not knowing :)

    Cheers

    PeteS
     

  6. For someone posting on the basics newsgroup you are rather rude. If
    you don't want to help someone, don't make fun of them. this isn't SED,
    and the OP isn't claiming to be an EE, so get over yourself.


    --
    Service to my country? Been there, Done that, and I've got my DD214 to
    prove it.
    Member of DAV #85.

    Michael A. Terrell
    Central Florida
     
  7. Chris

    Chris Guest

    Hi, Pete. You're right, of course. A few people have said the
    unofficial motto of s.e.b. should be that "There's no question too
    basic for this newsgroup". We don't want to scare off the newbies.

    Look at his 15 topic posts over the last two weeks in s.e.b., s.e.d.
    and sci.electronics.components, and judge for yourself. Look
    particularly at the posts relating to his weigh scale project, load
    cells and the LCD display. I'm thinking in particular about his post
    early this morning in s.e.d. "Hi, All (Load Cell)", and the several
    following spam posts, "please help me".

    He really needs much more help than the advice he can get here, and
    he's not being fair to himself looking for that help in newsgroups.
    His project will never get done by the end of the semester. And
    incidentally, I've heard it expressed a few times here that the
    function of homework and class projects is to reinforce learning, and
    we're defeating that purpose by serving up answers to homework
    questions.

    Joshua is apparently in so far over his head that a good answer to his
    question might not even help. If he does understand anything about
    digital logic and counting, he doesn't indicate it. And if he did, the
    most appropriate response here would actually be to have somebody find
    out what Digital Logic textbook they're using in his class, obtaining
    the book, then typing up the chapter on ADCs in a post (including
    illustrations in ASCII art ;-). He really should just read it himself,
    and purchase the textbook if he hasn't done so. Sometimes there are no
    shortcuts to learning -- you just have to do it. We did.

    Every college and technical school has sharp kids who are looking for a
    few extra honest coins (I would have included myself among those back
    in the day). It might be better for him to just find one, and get some
    tutoring and/or design help with his project. If he doesn't understand
    the classwork, several hours a week of one-on-one intensive help might
    get him on track quickly without a whole lot of expense.

    I do like the fact that nobody's flaming him here, including me. I
    wish Joshua well, and hope he gets all the help he needs.

    Cheers
    Chris
     
  8. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    you are correct, its basicly how
    accurate you can decode an analog
    signal.
    results of the lowest and highest
    value would most likely be the same
    as lower bit converters how ever,
    each reading you get is of larger
    scale number between the same range
    as that of the lower bit converters.
    for example..
    an 8 bit coverter has a range of
    0..255 , 0 = 0 volts, 255 = 10 volts for example.
    a 16 bit converter has a range of
    0..65535, 0 = 0 volts, 65535 = 10 volts...

    you can see here that between the low and
    high you can get more accurate readings.
    now sampling rates is still another story.
     
  9. PeteS

    PeteS Guest

    Well, there are some who seem to continue to ask questions on
    'advanced' things without asking for basics first , although that (for
    a few posts anyway) is perhaps understandable - they don't know there
    are basics underlying the question.

    After a few such posts, provided we've explained that the OP might like
    to ask very basic questions where we could even point to a resource on
    said basics, it does tend to get old.

    That said, I didn't see the posts in question (I was netless for a
    while on a job - aarrgghh) so I don't know this particular history :)

    I think I get more pee'd at poor grammar and spelling than apparently
    silly questions - after all, if I can't understand the question,
    there's little hope of answering it !

    I don't doubt you had no intention to flame :)

    Cheers

    PeteS
     
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