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Identifying EL-backlight for LCD

Discussion in 'Misc Electronics' started by Hallvard Tangeraas, Apr 7, 2004.

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  1. I'm servicing a friend's music sampler (Akai S-1100) which has a worn
    out backlight for the LCD. As far as I can tell, this is of the
    "electro-luminensce" (EL) type.

    It's very thin, has two electrodes fastened to one end (which is
    attached via a cable to a small transformer). It's pink on one side
    and silver on the other and has a transparent coating over both sides.
    It doesn't light up at all (which I'm sure I would see if it did light
    up), so I suppose it's dead.

    I'm trying to find out where to get hold of a new one, but before that
    I need to know what to ask for (manufacturer, model number etc.).

    It's marked as follows on the silver (back) side:

    PW01-397C
    10125 0118


    Can anyone recognize it?



    Hallvard
     
  2. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

    ---
    It may be that the inverter is dead, not the lamp.

    With the lamp disconnected from the transformer, check the resistance
    across the lamp terminals. It should be infinite. If it isn't it's
    bad. Also, if it's not shorted, check the capacitance acoss the
    lamp's teminals. It should be in the range of tens to hundreds of
    nanofarads. If it's OK, then check the inverter with the lamp plugged
    in. It should should put out high voltage AC; probably less than a
    couple of hundred volts peak-to-peak and less than 2000 Hz. (WAG, it
    depends...)

    Bottom line is if your inverter works but the lamp stays dark then
    yeah, it's the lamp.
     
  3. Roger Gt

    Roger Gt Guest

    X-No-Archive: yes
    : (Hallvard Tangeraas) wrote:
    :
    : >I'm servicing a friend's music sampler (Akai S-1100) which has
    a worn
    : >out backlight for the LCD. As far as I can tell, this is of the
    : >"electro-luminensce" (EL) type.
    : >
    : >It's very thin, has two electrodes fastened to one end (which
    is
    : >attached via a cable to a small transformer). It's pink on one
    side
    : >and silver on the other and has a transparent coating over both
    sides.
    : >It doesn't light up at all (which I'm sure I would see if it
    did light
    : >up), so I suppose it's dead.
    :
    : ---
    : It may be that the inverter is dead, not the lamp.
    :
    : With the lamp disconnected from the transformer, check the
    resistance
    : across the lamp terminals. It should be infinite. If it isn't
    it's
    : bad. Also, if it's not shorted, check the capacitance across
    the
    : lamp's terminals. It should be in the range of tens to hundreds
    of
    : nanofarads. If it's OK, then check the inverter with the lamp
    plugged
    : in. It should should put out high voltage AC; probably less
    than a
    : couple of hundred volts peak-to-peak and less than 2000 Hz.
    (WAG, it
    : depends...)
    :
    : Bottom line is if your inverter works but the lamp stays dark
    then
    : yeah, it's the lamp.
    :

    It is probably the inverter. however if you can isolate the two
    terminals for the lamp -- And only if you can. You can test the
    lame by connecting it to a source of 120VAC at 50 or 60 HZ. In
    reduced light it should light. If it lights the inverter has
    failed. A voltmeter across the two terminals of the inverter
    should show about 120 to 140 Vac at about 400 to 2,000 HZ.
     
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