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Identifying an unmarked plug

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by tomtomnz, Nov 5, 2012.

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  1. tomtomnz

    tomtomnz

    2
    0
    Nov 5, 2012
    Hi Guys

    I have a ceramic connector for a wireline system that has no part number. I am looking for some assistance in identifying it and sourcing new units, any help would be greatly appreciated. I have attached some photos of it.

    At the back it has four small solder sockets for conductor wires, which lead to the four sockets at the front end. It is used in borehole logging (geophysics) systems by a number of manufacturers.

    It measures 159mm long x 13mm diameter at the widest part.

    Have you seen these before? Do you know where I oculd source them from?

    Thanks very much!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,701
    462
    Jan 15, 2010
    When I see a problem like this, I start looking-up the manufacturers of the instruments
    I know that use them, looking for any part numbers I might be able to cross reference.
    It sounds like a lot of those instrument manufacturers use the same connector, one
    of them might list enough information in their equipment manuals, for you to cross the
    part number they list to what you're looking for.
    This is an environmentally sealed connector, I'd try looking-up companies that manufacture
    those type of connectors, if my first idea doesn't pan-out.
    Another thing to consider, is where the instruments that use this connector are made.
    Might this connector be used primarily with European, American, or Asian equipment?
    That would narrow your search of various manufacturers.
     
  3. tomtomnz

    tomtomnz

    2
    0
    Nov 5, 2012
    Cheers!

    Thanks for the info. We did essentially what you suggested and found out the part was made by SeaCon in Europe. They specialise in underwater connections for ROV's, etc.

    Also searching Google Images for 'black four pin plug' yielded some clues. We'd assumed the plug was ceramic, but it was glass reinforced epoxy. That narrowed the field somewhat.

    Thanks again for the help



     
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