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identify an IC

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by docb, Apr 5, 2014.

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  1. docb

    docb

    131
    2
    Feb 11, 2010
    I have a small 6 pin IC that says 0290 on it.

    Any hints? It's used in a headphone accessory.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,251
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    Jan 21, 2010
    I can't find anything in my lists of codes.

    Can you post a picture of this device, clear and sharp enough that we can determine the package (if we can read the "0290" it's good enough)
     
  3. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I have a new list of SMD parts that I'll look up when I have access to it. If I don't get back to you in a couple of hours, poke me!
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I've had a look through the 4396 pages of codes, and I can't find an 0290 :-(

    Sorry
     
  5. docb

    docb

    131
    2
    Feb 11, 2010
    What might that mean? Some secret IC?
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,251
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    ICs that small have no room for the full part number. Manufacturers instead place a short code on the device.

    When you get the datasheet for the device it will describe the markings. Say you have an AXFT981256A-N3. The manufacturer may tell you the part is labelled T6A.

    This is fine if you're building something because you might have one part labelled T6A, another labelled 01, and the last labelled 0290.

    These markings are fine for you, because you know what they mean. However for someone trying to repair your device and without the crossreference to the part number they are less helpful.

    Clearly they are more helpful than nothing. People have (and continue to) scour datasheets for this information and compile lists of them -- one of which I regularly purchase.

    In the case above (and having access to one of these lists) you might find that the first code has only one known device using it -- great!

    However 01A might be a very common code used by 10 or 20 devices, even limited by the actual package outline. In this case you might be lucky to find that many of the devices are very similar, but a few others will be unique. At least you now have a starting point. You can look up the datasheets of all these parts and maybe find one that seems likely to be in the circuit and where the connections to it make sense.

    All too often though, the code leads nowhere and you have no real help.

    It may be because, while it is a relatively common part, nobody has submitted the code, or the manufacturer has recently changed the code, or perhaps did so for a large customer who wanted a particular code on the device, or it may be something new, rarely used, etc.

    Each of these cases above pose their own particular problems, but it's safe to say that the code is looking more like a dead end.
     
  7. docb

    docb

    131
    2
    Feb 11, 2010
    ok, thanks very much!
     
  8. docb

    docb

    131
    2
    Feb 11, 2010
    Could it be a microcontroller?
     
  9. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

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    Nov 28, 2011
    Yes; microcontrollers in 6-pin SOT-23 packages are available from Atmel and Microchip, and possibly others.
     
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