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Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by bigone5500, Aug 16, 2014.

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  1. bigone5500

    bigone5500

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    Apr 9, 2014
    I found this in my box of parts. I do not know where I got it from but want to know what it is.

    part.jpg
     
  2. KMoffett

    KMoffett

    720
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    Jan 21, 2009
    Diode of some sort...signal, Zener, diac, Schottky, rectifier...Silicon, Germanium...?

    Ken
     
  3. bigone5500

    bigone5500

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    120
    Apr 9, 2014
    I found this: [​IMG] ... but it doesn't seem to correspond with the markings on my component. I have done a lot of searching but have only come up empty handed.
     
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    The internal construction doesn't look like a diode to me ( it may be)

    its possible that its a resistor or a capacitor. There was a period of years where SMD resistors and caps
    were mounted inside a glass encapsulation so that they could be used as a normal through hole component

    Dave
     
  5. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    120
    Apr 9, 2014
    My above post wouldn't show the colors but here it is.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    I would advise you to connect it up to your multimeter and read the resistance (both ways) and using the diode test function (again. both ways).

    This won't tell you if it's a zener, but it will identify resistor/cap/diode, and will also allow you to distinguish between a silicon PN junction and germanium or schottky (nether of the alternatives are likely to be zeners).

    To see if it's a zener create a voltage source from one or more 9V batteries in series, and with a resistor of about 1k per volt of total battery voltage in series, measure the voltage drop of the diode connected both ways around.
     
  7. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    120
    Apr 9, 2014
    After connecting it to my meter and doing everything I could to get a reading, I grabbed a 9v battery and touched the ends both ways and not spark. Nothing whatsoever. I think I salvaged a blown fuse of some sort.
     
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    You do need to take readings.

    If you get nothing from all the tests then it may be a capacitor as suggests as a possibility by Dave.
     
  9. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,164
    1,081
    Dec 18, 2013
    Possibly a Glass Encapsulated NTC Thermistors.
    Adam
     
  10. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
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    Apr 9, 2014
    That's what it looks like.
     
  11. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,164
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    Dec 18, 2013
    :)
     
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    And yet there were no readings on the multimeter, even on resistance ranges?
     
  13. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
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    Apr 9, 2014
    No. The meter only gave me an open reading.
     
  14. gorgon

    gorgon

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    Jun 6, 2011
    Could it be a glass gas discharge device for overvoltage protection?
     
    Allen Bong and bigone5500 like this.
  15. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    120
    Apr 9, 2014
    Yes! That's what it is! Looks just like it.
     
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