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ID 8-pin DIP

Discussion in 'Datasheets, Manuals and Component Identification' started by oqtoe, Apr 26, 2018.

  1. oqtoe

    oqtoe

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    Apr 26, 2018
    I have an 8-pin DIN that's been recently fried on the board of a humidifier. I'm looking to replace it, though I'm having trouble identifying it from the "7A67" on the bottom of the chip. The top of the chip has unfortunately melted off:

    [​IMG]

    I think it may be a DC voltage step-down, though I'm not certain. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Any more information on the humidifier? Make, model etc? A picture of the pcb and area around where the IC was originally located may help us identify it. That code shown is meaningless (to me)
     
  3. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    agreed ... unfortunately ... useless info

    the part number would be on the top and if that cannot be seen, then you have a problem .... show a photo of the top side anyway

    maybe the manufacturer will sell you a replacement board ?
     
  4. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    I'm thinking along davenn's line of thought.
    It'd be hard for me to believe a melted 8-pin DIP is your only circuit problem here.
    Something, somewhere, CAUSED that DIP to melt.
    Without a schematic of the circuit, a new board (and if not, a new humidifier) might be in order here.
     
    hevans1944 and Harald Kapp like this.
  5. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Doesn't look melted to me. It looks to be covered with a conformal coating.
     
    hevans1944, JWHassler and davenn like this.
  6. oqtoe

    oqtoe

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    Apr 26, 2018
    The manufacture label on the back of the board shows as "Foshan Hanyi Computer Co., Ltd" 0757-83835908. This is for a TaoTronics TT‑AH006 humidifier. The URL listed on the back isn't reachable the last time I tried, and the part number doesn't return this specific board from what I can tell visually. I did find other Hanyi boards off eBay, but not specifically this one:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    You are right though, it is definitely not just the DIP that melted. A couple resistors and probable a capacitor also fried.

    The DIP was hot glued down, along with a few others on the board.
     
  7. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Check the fuse (F1) likely blown.
    Check Q1 - likely shorted.
    The IC is probably an SMPS controller device - what type number is Q1?
    Show the actual top of the blown IC.
     
  8. oqtoe

    oqtoe

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    Apr 26, 2018
    Yeah, the fuse is blown.
    Q1 is a JCS4N60F MOSFET.

    Here's the top of the IC:
    [​IMG]
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Yep, that looks like a catastrophic failure.

    You may have to find someone with an intact unit who can read the part number for you if there's no documentation available.

    It may be possible to reverse engineer the circuit to determine something about it, but that's not going to give you a part number.
     
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    It's likely to be some sort of offline switch mode controller. That board mostly appears to be a power supply.

    I think R6 may have been given a bit of a workout too.
     
  11. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Multi-output switching power supply, flyback topology, with only one output populated. Surprisingly large power transformer relative to the size of the output connector. Good chance the chip is from Power Integrations or Motorola (ON Semi), although some Chinese designers like weird parts from Cherry.

    ak
     
  12. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    What are the actual power output voltages? I think I can see a 12V line - are there any others?

    I'm thinking you could remove Q1 and the transformer, apply the 'missing voltages from a different PSU straight to the output terminal block, leaving all the other connectors in place (for the relay operation etc).

    If you can find space to fit a separate unit this may be the solution.
     
  13. oqtoe

    oqtoe

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    Apr 26, 2018
    I think a separate unit might not be bad idea. I'm seeing both a 12V and a 34V line.
    If that doesn't work, I suppose I could try casually dismantling a TaoTronics unit at my local Walmart.
     
  14. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    :p yeah - I'd like to see (hear) how the store staff respond to that kind of action!!! If you can - sure!
     
    davenn likes this.
  15. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    unless you want to end up in court before a judge and getting possible jail time
    I seriously wouldn't reccomend that move
     
  16. Kawaray

    Kawaray

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    Feb 23, 2019
    Sorry I'm a "bit" late, just signed in as I have the same problem.
    The IC is a OB2263ap. The power Transistor is a 4N60F.
    You'll need to check the diodes and inductives as well.
    Cheers and Good Luck
     
  17. FuZZ1L0G1C

    FuZZ1L0G1C

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    Mar 25, 2014
    IC1 = 8-pin "Carbon Resistor" !!! :eek: ;)
     
  18. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009

    Not likely ... how did you come to that conclusion ?

    99% probability that it is the switching chip
     
  19. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I think he was referring to is current state, not it's original state :)
     
    davenn likes this.
  20. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    Wow! Chinese "quality control" scores again! That said, and with a little help from Google and Google Translate, I found that Foshan Hanyi Electronic Technology Co., Ltd. has several web pages that you can find by using this Google search string: "who is www.hanny.com.cn" and clicking on "Translate This Page" when the Chinese results appear. Here is one of the links I got using this method.

    Hanyi is a rather large mainland China switching power supply manufacturer, selling in humongous quantities (millions of units) exclusively to the embedded OEM market. You should be able to find and replace the defective power supply board with one of similar capability (whatever that is), but there is no guarantee that the maker of the humidifier, Tao Tronics, actually specified an adequate power supply, or provided it with any protection against power-line surges or other happenstances that are known killers of these things. There are lots of unhappy customers posting on the web about Tao Tronics ultrasonic humidifiers.

    If products identical with, or similar to, your humidifier are available at Wally-World, as you suggested in your post #13, I would go ahead and buy at least two: one to replace your defective product and the second one to reverse engineer for spare parts. Good luck with that.

    BTW, those are excellent photos you have provided, and you received some really insightful comments from the EP responders. Please visit here often! Perhaps you would like to try constructing your own ultrasonic humidifier? We can help with that.
     
    davenn likes this.
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