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I2C RTC module question

Discussion in 'Microcontrollers, Programming and IoT' started by bigone5500, Oct 11, 2014.

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  1. bigone5500

    bigone5500

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    Apr 9, 2014
    Which side should I put the pins? Do I really need the SQ pin?

    tmp_14282-20141010_170916-1-1261561315.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2014
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,257
    2,705
    Jan 21, 2010
    Well... I'd put the pins in an orientation so I could read the writing on the board when it was plugged into whatever.

    If you're placing it on a breadboard or a PCB, it is fairly intuitive that the pins should be placed through from the rear side of the board and soldered on top. If you do it this way you'll need to be sure that the pins clear the battery that's mounted on the rear side of the board.

    However if you're (say) hot-gluing it to a surface (again, consider the battery) and you intend to run patch cables to (say) your arduino, then it would make sense to place them in from the top and solder them on the rear side.

    As to whether you need the SQ pin, the answer is "only if you need it". Check the datasheet for the DS1307 and see what it's used for (hint: it produces a square wave output). Do you need that? If you're using a sketch that someone else has written, does it specify a connection to this? This is not a question that has a yes/no answer.
     
  3. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    120
    Apr 9, 2014
    What I meant is which set of holes should I put the pins? I'm under the impression that both sides are the same...SDA, SCL.. so, if I put pins on the left side which has 5 pins, then I don't see why I would need the other side. Unless I needed the square wave output.
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,257
    2,705
    Jan 21, 2010
    Oh, OK. (that makes more sense)

    I imagine all the pins are connected through. Just verify that the like-labelled pins are connected through. If they are (and I suspect they are) then it's up to you.

    I'd probably connect pins to the side with the larger number of exposed pins if I had any reason to suspect that I might ever want them. As an example the BAT pin would allow you to monitor the battery voltage and warn when it was getting low.
     
  5. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    120
    Apr 9, 2014
    Great! I like the battery monitoring idea.

    Thanks!
     
  6. bigone5500

    bigone5500

    712
    120
    Apr 9, 2014
    I'm pretty sure now that the longer row is the main pins and the shorter row is for pass through to other I2C devices.
     
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