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I want help for my seminar

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Jibin, Jul 20, 2015.

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  1. Jibin

    Jibin

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    Jul 20, 2015
    Hi, I am taking seminar on nfc(near field communication)...is this is a good way of communication today..
     
  2. hevans1944

    hevans1944 Hop - AC8NS

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    Jun 21, 2012
    It has its uses for short-range wireless communications over about a foot or two. Things like sharing data or images between two cell phones, or relaying sound to a pair of ear-buds from a NFC transmitter worn on the body. The NFC transmitter can get audio from a variety of sources such as Bluetooth and home entertainment systems, also communicating via Bluetooth. I have a defibrillator/pacemaker implanted in my chest that uses NFC to communicate with a data pod. I place the pod against my chest for about a minute or two to transfer data to the pod, then I place the pod in a "recharging stand" that also contains a cellular network transceiver. The latter operates on RF frequencies, not NFC, to send the data to my doctor. More applications appear every day. It seems ideal for keyless entry systems if properly encrypted.
     
    Jibin and Arouse1973 like this.
  3. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    Wouldn't it be great to get rid of those horrible little metal dangly things in your pocket that you use to open locks with? You could simply program your car, motorcycle, garage, gate, etc. to unlock in the presence of your card. One 'key' to rule them all. (Batteries not included)
    Furthermore, the receiver can be physically hidden to prevent tampering, and the removal of the mechanical lock will cut down on those pesky thieves that like to ruin locks with flat-head screwdrivers.
     
  4. Jibin

    Jibin

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    Jul 20, 2015
    Sir,
    Is there any block diagram available for nfc..?
     
  5. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    Not sure what kind of block diagram you want...
    NFC is a term for a type of wireless technology that varies extensively.
    Tags can be Passive or Active, the distance for NFC can vary by quite a bit, the tags can be read/only or read/write. NFC could refer to two-way communications between phones or other devices... It's too much to cover with a block diagram unless you can provide an intended or desired use for NFC.
     
  6. Jibin

    Jibin

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    Jul 20, 2015
    I want to present about a simple basic block diagram of NFC for any kind of use like ticket booking,bill paying,etc.
    Thanks
     
  7. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    Then draw it yourself ;)

    NFC can be split up into various pieces.

    Simple Setup:
    NFCCard/KeyChain => NFC Reader => Computer/Authentication System => Electronic Lock


    The customer can use various NFC devices ranging from implantable tabs measuring a couple mm across, to NFC enabled cards, keychains, stickers, etc. These are passive tags, as they have no in-built power source, and as such usually have a lower range, and limited functions.
    The 'tags' usually include digital memory that can be read, although some tags can be written to. The can be open or encrypted.
    Active NFC devices, such as cellular phones may have more features depending on the program responsible for handling the NFC communications.

    The business uses NFC readers which are responsible for reading the data from the NFC tag/device . This NFC reader 'can' also write data to the device depending on the device and the application. Typically the NFC reader will be connected to a form of authentication system that will check it's records for the NFC tag's details and make adjustments based on which scanner was read. The authentication system will usually interface with real-world equipment allowing a secure item such as a door / elevator to be used.

    If you would like to use the system for payments, there are three approaches you can take.
    -'Pre-loading' NFC devices with funds. From that point on the NFC device can now use the systems until the balance runs low/empty.
    -Registering the NFC device with payment information such as a credit card, so that you system makes a debit every time the NFC item is scanned.
    -Work with a local banking institution on getting NFC payment terminals so that customers can swipe their NFC enabled payment devices to pay for services.

    From here, it's up to you to finish the research and determine which systems will be best suited for use for your application.
    If you cannot do this, then perhaps you should not be presenting this technology in the seminar.
     
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