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I want a passively cooled desktop/cpu/gpu by 2016, power supply may have fan.

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Skybuck Flying, Dec 8, 2012.

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  1. Hello,

    I play to buy a new computer by 2016, currently I am concerned that the
    computer I want is not for sale/possible.

    So far intel and/or amd is not selling passively cooleable CPUs for desktops
    ?! Could this explain the decrease in PC sales ? People diverting to
    noiseless tablets ?

    Amazing that no passively cooleable cpus seem to be for sale ?

    With passively cooleable cpu I consider:

    1. CPU + heatsink with fins smallist, no fan, no other things, except maybe
    thermal paste interface material between cpu and heatsink.

    So two questions:

    1. Which desktop cpu by 2016 will be passively cooleable ?

    2. How many watts are passively cooleable with a small heatsink/fins, like
    gt 520 from asus is a good example.

    (Also the motherboard must be passively cooled as well as all other
    components except perhaps power supply, though if a modest power supply is
    needed might be passively cooled too, but a little bit of airflow seems
    wise... though would be cool if it wasnt needed at all, than no dust in pc
    which would be excellent.)

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  2. This website mentions 10 watt idle and 29 watt active for gt 520 which is a
    good example of a chip being passively cooled, though power supply does suck
    some heat from it probably:

    "
    Power consumption should also be similar; NVIDIA gives the GT 520 a TDP of
    29W, while we’d expect the idle TDP to be around 10W.
    "

    http://www.anandtech.com/show/4268/nvidia-releases-geforce-gt-520

    So 25 watts seems to be on the safe side.

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  3. * and laptops

    "Skybuck Flying" wrote in message

    Hello,

    I play to buy a new computer by 2016, currently I am concerned that the
    computer I want is not for sale/possible.

    So far intel and/or amd is not selling passively cooleable CPUs for desktops
    ?! Could this explain the decrease in PC sales ? People diverting to
    noiseless tablets ? *

    Amazing that no passively cooleable cpus seem to be for sale ?

    With passively cooleable cpu I consider:

    1. CPU + heatsink with fins smallist, no fan, no other things, except maybe
    thermal paste interface material between cpu and heatsink.

    So two questions:

    1. Which desktop cpu by 2016 will be passively cooleable ?

    2. How many watts are passively cooleable with a small heatsink/fins, like
    gt 520 from asus is a good example.

    (Also the motherboard must be passively cooled as well as all other
    components except perhaps power supply, though if a modest power supply is
    needed might be passively cooled too, but a little bit of airflow seems
    wise... though would be cool if it wasnt needed at all, than no dust in pc
    which would be excellent.)

    Bye,
    Skybuck.
     
  4. Quadibloc

    Quadibloc Guest

    Why shouldn't they be able to do this?

    After all, look at the chips they're putting in tablets these days.
    They don't need fans, and they're a lot more powerful than the 386
    chips of yesteryear that didn't need fans.

    So why can't you buy such a desktop computer right now?

    Well, two reasons.

    Microsoft doesn't sell Windows 3.1 any more. To run the operating
    systems it sells now, the CPU's power has to be big and bloated like
    the operating system it runs. Even laptops these days have fans.

    A deskop computer costs more money than a tablet. So if you're going
    to pay that extra money, you want to get somethng for it. Like the
    ability to run Windows programs.

    John Savard
     
  5. miso

    miso Guest

    Actually most notebook PCs have fans, but they are very quiet when
    running. I've used my Dell ATG in a desert environment (ambient around
    46 deg C) and I assure you the fan was running.

    The Panasonic Toughbook 30 was fanless. It was full of heat pipes. I'm
    not sure about the 31 version.

    You need a very open case to run an Atom fanless. It can be done in
    moderate environments, but a small fan works wonders.
    With netbooks not selling well, Intel hasn't bothered to put the Atom on
    their finest geometry process, which would help with TDP.
     
  6. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    You could do this if you clocked them slow enough.
    Not many people are interested in doing that on
    the desktop platform. If you want something not
    many other people want, it will be either unavailable
    or very expensive.
     
  7. I play to buy a new computer by 2016, currently I am concerned that the
    These things exist. They're just less powerful and/or more expensive.

    My "home office" is in the living room, so my home desktop needs to be
    very quiet.

    For about 5 years, I've had an AMD Athlon X2 4800+ passively cooled
    (with a monster heatsink), tho the whole machine still had 2 fans: one
    for the power supply about which I don't know much, except that when it
    got noisy I bought a new power supply; and another fan for the system,
    the typical 120mm fan running at the lowest possible speed.

    I retired this machine and replaced it with a mini-itx system hosting an
    AMD E-350, again passively cooled. This one doesn't have a system fan,
    tho I haven't bought a pico-PSU yet, so it still has a fan within the
    power supply.

    In the real office, I use a fit-pc2 which is fully fanless, and if
    you're interested in fanless PC, I recommend you take a look at
    www.fit-pc.com.


    Stefan
     
  8. Ting Hsu

    Ting Hsu Guest

    As a big proponent of silent computing, I've been slowly working
    towards a completely silent PC (which implies fanless). Here's a few
    of my notes.

    1. Power supplies *can* be fanless; there are several on the market.
    But the one I ended up using was the SeaSonic X series, which only
    turns on its fan when necessary. Under normal situations (web
    browsing, email, MS Word, Excel, even youtube) the fan stays off. Only
    when I boot up games or photoshop does the fan turn on.

    2. Heat management is key. You must have a case design meant to deal
    well with heat. For example, my PSU is mounted at the bottom of my
    case, so that the PSU stays as cool as possible, so that its fan runs
    less often (because no internal components heat up the PSU).

    3. Completely fanless cases tend to have huge built in heat sink fins
    on the outside of the case, so that heat pipes from CPUs/GPUs can be
    connected directly to the case, to radiate heat. Due to attaching heat
    pipes to the case, it places some pretty hefty design constraints on
    your internal components, as they now have to be physical compatible
    with the case.

    4. Hard drives make noise. In fact, in my current system, they make
    *more* noise than my fans. Aka, big fans moving slowly generate less
    noise than a hard drive. So if noise reduction if your objective, it
    is not necessary to be completely fanless, only to be quieter than
    your hard drives.

    5. Water cooling can be very noisy, because water pumps are noisy (in
    fact, it's actually rare to find a quiet pump). Thus, a water cooled,
    fanless computer can still be noisier than a computer with fans.
     
  9. whit3rd

    whit3rd Guest

    So, you want a Macintosh mini? They've been Intel based in recent years.
     
  10. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    No particular reason the power supply has to be
    in the same room. Move it elsewhere.
    Or use flash.
     
  11. Ting Hsu

    Ting Hsu Guest

    Alrighty... you realize that a typical build uses at least 46 wires
    running from the PSU, right? 32 to the motherboard (a 24 pin and an 8
    pin), 6 to each SATA device, and 8 to the graphics card (16 on higher
    performance cards). So you are talking about running 46 wires of 0000
    gauge, with shielding, several feet, from another room, probably
    drilling a hole through the wall, just to keep the noise of the PSU
    down? And this seems more reasonable than a fanless PSU, or a PSU
    which can shut off it's fan?
     
  12. mike

    mike Guest

    I was gonna suggest earplugs that reduce the noise from the fans
    and the drives and the clicking of the keyboard and the sliding of the mouse
    and the furnace and the fridge and the cars going by and the kids playing
    and the wind blowing and the rain dripping and all the other things
    that must be driving him nutz.

    But, then I realized that the voices in his head wouldn't be affected.
    Bummer.
     
  13. EricP

    EricP Guest

    You could program the microphone and speakers to emit an inverse wave
    canceling out all sounds, creating a 'cone of silence' around your PC.
    Maybe just imagine an inverse wave for those.
     
  14. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    Get off your fat *** and do some online searching.
    Ages ago (months..) i saw a few passively cooled PCs, and they also
    can be "scratch" built as well.
    Concentrate on the CPU power and the cooling system that will be
    attached.
     
  15. Jasen Betts

    Jasen Betts Guest

    move the whole computer just bring the video audio and usb cables into
    the room.
     
  16. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    Those are the body thetans talking. He'll get rid
    of those when he does his OT levels.
     
  17. Les Cargill

    Les Cargill Guest

    There went a perfectly good keyboard.
     
  18. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    More than ONE union...electrical, construction, ventilation, heating,
    cooling, supervisor, project and i do not know what else.
     
  19. Following in that direction, just access the computer using VNC,
    Remote Desktop or a Goode-Olde X-Server running in a tablet.
     
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