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I can't get power to this vacuum pump

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by pologenius21, Sep 14, 2011.

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  1. pologenius21

    pologenius21

    13
    0
    Sep 14, 2011
    hi, i'm new to the electronics game and this forum so everybody bear with me for a minute. i just purchased a vacuum pump from an online industrial vendor, now the power supply doesn't have a regular 120v house outlet but has a 4 pin adapter. I am not even in entry level in electronics and have no idea how to convert the 4 pin adapter so that i can plug it in to a wall outlet. the 4 pin colors are 2 black one brown and one blue. if you could help in any way thanks sooo much and if not thanks again.
     
  2. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,827
    520
    Jan 15, 2010
    Contact the vendor, and ask them.
    Didn't you get an instruction sheet when you made the purchase?
    The vendor or the manufacturer will be able to give you the information you need.
    If you don't do any of that. Tell us the manufacturer and model number of your pump,
    and somebody here will probably find the information for you on-line (or you can do it
    yourself).
    People here like to help. But when you ask a question like this, you need to give
    us the information you have. Manufacturer and model number of the pump.
     
  3. pologenius21

    pologenius21

    13
    0
    Sep 14, 2011
    Thanks for responding. The item in question is a Thomas 2505CE38 45-985 Compressor and Vacuum Pump. I purchased this item because in the description it states that it can pull up to 27" Hg and that's ideal for vacuum infusions for fiberglass, which is the project I am currently on. But again the only power source it has coming from the motor is a 4 pin adapter, with 2 black one brown and one white wire. If anyone can help in any way it is much appreciated, as of now the project's on hold until I do more research.
     
  4. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    Here is an eBay listing with pictures showing the connector. It seems to be a Molex connector - of the same type that is used on the good old PC power supplies.
    But that's not the only thing you need. It is a Permanent Split Capacitor Motor and it needs a 30uF 370V AC capacitor, like on this, or this pump.
     
  5. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,827
    520
    Jan 15, 2010
    I used Thomas pump/compressors in industrial pneumatic valve applications.
    They're great.
    They also have excellent product support with parts and spec sheets.
    Resqueline gave you the info you need. If you need more help, Thomas can give
    it to you.
    You made a good choice there. Thomas is one of the best.
     
  6. pologenius21

    pologenius21

    13
    0
    Sep 14, 2011
    Man, having this much help really means a lot to a DIY'er like me. I'm only 26 but I have a passion to create and to invent, and the work never stops. I will continue my research and will keep you guys posted on my progress. Thanks again for shedding a little more light on the subject.
     
  7. pologenius21

    pologenius21

    13
    0
    Sep 14, 2011
    Okay I am about to place an order online for my 30uF capacitor, but what do I need to do with the capacitor in order to run it to a home outlet?
     
  8. KMoffett

    KMoffett

    723
    75
    Jan 21, 2009
    The two terminals on the capacitor will be connected to the two black wires. The blue wire will be connected to the power Neutral. The brown wire will be connected through a switch to the power Hot. A green wire should be connected from the motor case to power Ground. In the US, power cords are black=Hot, white=Neutral, green=Ground

    Ken
     
  9. pologenius21

    pologenius21

    13
    0
    Sep 14, 2011
    i just went to the shed and remembered i have an old tv with tons of capacitors. so there's this one that says 100uF 200v AC. the sticker on the motor says 115v. this capacitor will i have will work right?
     
  10. KMoffett

    KMoffett

    723
    75
    Jan 21, 2009
    No! The capacitor you need is 30uF. This is not a filter capacitor , where more is better. It's for phase shifting, so the value is important. The voltage in an inductive load can peak higher than you line voltage. Go with the 30uF/370VAC one.

    Ken
     
  11. pologenius21

    pologenius21

    13
    0
    Sep 14, 2011
    Okay. i almost made a big mistake then huh? lol. I'll try that one Ken and see how it works. Thanks again, I'll post back shortly.
    Jay
     
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