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I am trying to save on my electric bill

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by sailpete1958, Aug 17, 2010.

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  1. sailpete1958

    sailpete1958

    4
    0
    Aug 17, 2010
    l Hi,
    I am trying to save on my electric bill by hooking a new 12 volt car battery to my 1hp electric pool pump.
    "question; How can I power my pool pump with a 12 volt car battery. I have a solar panal trickle charger that I use on my boat's 12 volt battery to recharge it and I think it would work on a battery running my pool pump.
    Do I need an adapter to change DC to Ac current?

    sailPete
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2010
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,477
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    Jan 21, 2010
    Let's do some "back of the envelope" calculations.

    Assume the solar trickle charger is 10W, and that you have the equivalent of 8 hours of 100% sunlight, and the calorific efficiency of the battery is 70%.

    That means you'll get 56WHr of energy per day.

    Now let's assume that the inverter is 90% efficient and your pool pump is rated at 500W. Effectively you'll be able to deliver 51Wh of energy to the pump, which is about 6 minutes of operation.

    Do you need the pool pump on more than 6 minutes per day? (for power costs here -- does your poop pump use about 1/2c per day or less?)

    My guess is that the amount of energy you'd get is far too low to make a difference.

    And at 1/2 a cent per day, you're going to take a long time to pay off the battery, the solar panel and the inverter.
     
  3. LTX71CM

    LTX71CM

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    May 23, 2010
    I'm with (*steve*) here, I'm all about saving energy and money but I don't think this project is feasible or cost effective.

    If you want to save money start other places in the home, change incandescent bulbs out for LED or CFL versions (pay attention here, you could easily spend more on the bulbs than you'll save on electricity), turn off unused appliances and if possible unplug them (including cell phone chargers!), turn off computers when they're not being used, raise the thermostat a few degrees in the summer, make use of natural light and so on.
     
  4. NickS

    NickS

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    Apr 6, 2010
    Good question but perhaps to personal a question for this forum... We need a moderator to clean up the potty language in this thread.
     
  5. sailpete1958

    sailpete1958

    4
    0
    Aug 17, 2010
    running my pool pump by 12volt car battery to save

    Thanks for the advice.
    running my pool pump by 12volt car battery to save on my electric bill doesn't sound practical.
    But, I am still curious how much electricity my 1 HP electric pool pump uses if I run it about 8 hours a day? Can anyone tell me?
    My electric bill was $210. in July. this is a remodeled (15k) wooden frame and wood siding 3/2 foreclosed 1500' house in central florida with a big in-ground pool that I purchased for 45k and moved into june 1, 2010. At my age, 69, I don't want any mortgage.
    I keep my central Ac set at 80 degrees and keep 2 new fans running 24/7.The heat index has been over 100 the last 2 months. It is only me and my 2 cats and I have a TV and computer.
    I know my AC and Hot water heater are the two big electricity consumers in any home and I have turned down my hot water temp. and make sure appliances and lights are shut off.
    Hopefully with cooler weather coming in the fall and winter months my bill should drop below $200. mo.
    I was told by an electrican that fans cost about ten cents an hour to run while my new Central Ac unit would cost about one dollar an hour to operate. Is this correct?
    Thanks again for your expert advice.
    Pete
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,477
    2,820
    Jan 21, 2010
    google tells me 1 HP = 745.699872W
    745.699872W * 8 hours = 5965.598976 Whr = 5.965598976 kWhr

    So it's using about 6 kWhr per day, lets call that 180 kWhr per month.

    What does your power cost per kWHr?

    Hahahaha, the installer for our airconditioner said exactly the same thing $1/hr. Maybe they googled it from the same place? It adds about $300/month to our bills in summer, but I work from home so it's on all day.
     
  7. LTX71CM

    LTX71CM

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    May 23, 2010
    Don't forget refrigerators, probably the next biggest consumer, it's kind of a must have but I still wanted to mention it. Also make sure your water heater isn't turned down so low that your dishwasher doesn't properly sanitize your dishes. I seem to remember a temp of 140 degrees and up is acceptable, above that temp the heating element in the dishwasher have the proper effect.
     
  8. sailpete1958

    sailpete1958

    4
    0
    Aug 17, 2010
    Saving electricity!

    Steve,

    What does your power cost per kWHr?
    According to my last bill the first 1000 kwh cost 6.9 cents and
    above 1000 KWH the cost is 7.9 cents
    my monthly usage was1641 KWH = $119.99
    looks to me like KWH is 28.3 cents. the bill says "daily avg. electric cost = $6.80" and my daily avg. use is 53/KWH/day.
    Then of course u have taxes etc.
    My total bill for July was $231. Too much!
    Pete
     
  9. sailpete1958

    sailpete1958

    4
    0
    Aug 17, 2010
    refrig & applicances

    I have the stove shut off and I cook with microwave 10min or less aday. (I love Mc d's) and I don't use the automatic dishwasher. But my refrig is old and I might want to get a new one if my electric bill does not go down alot soon.
    I don't use my clothes dryer because here in florida they dry outside fast!
    I use my clothes washer once a month.
    I have only lived here since june but my other house was concrete and block and never went over $200. mo. for power!
     
  10. LTX71CM

    LTX71CM

    182
    0
    May 23, 2010
    Seems like you thought of just about everything at this point. Have you tried switching off all of the lights, turning off and unplugging what appliances you can to check for power draw you're unaware of? With everything off check the power meter, if it's still spinning something is burning power you don't know about.

    I live in Saint Louis and with a house of three people, three TVs on most of the time, three computers either on or in standby, a fridge, dryer used every few days, washer used just as often, dishwasher twice a week, AC set to 70 (which means it cycles about every 15mins), a room air conditioner for an upstairs bedroom and countless other devices our bill doesn't hit 200/month. I find it hard to believe cost per/kw is the only reason. And no, our appliances are not high efficiency models unfortunately.
     
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,477
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    Jan 21, 2010
    Yeah, appliances on standby can draw a significant amount of power, and can really add up ig you have a lot of them.

    A leaky seal on a fridge will do very bad things for power consumption (especially if the house is already fairly warm). If you fridge has a problem with low refrigerant, you will also have high power use (generally accompanied by a very cold freezer and a warm fridge)

    I would get one of those things that measures power use for an appliance plugged into them. Yo can set them up, and leave them for 24hours before reading the power usage directly in units, $, etc. Move it from appliance to appliance until you spot the one(s) doing you damage.
     
  12. markcomp

    markcomp

    4
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    Feb 20, 2012
    Just came across this post while searching for something else - great forum I could waste a lot of time here. Back to the point. I am a Brit now living in Hungary, a great little country that has been in the news of late due to its politics - it will blow over nuff said.
    I have built a house here and heat the place with 3 cubic metres of wood a year and have 5 solar hot water panels on the roof. We use the washer a lot and as it only has a cold fill, run it from the hot for 5 minutes before switching to cold - a bit Heath Robinson but I cannot see a way around it. The dishwasher only has a cold fill so i have thought about a mixer valve so it can pull "free" hot water.(no way of easily fitting a hot and cold tap as per the washer in the cellar) However i did read that the first cold rinse is important so you don't "set" proteins i.e. egg etc on the dishes. Is this correct and if so what temp should I set the mixer to to avoid the dishwasher using too much electricity to heat the water? Sorry not quite an electronics question.
    Next house if I live long enough will be off grid! Any good links appreciated:)
     
  13. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,766
    1,920
    Sep 5, 2009
    so far you have only talked about water heating
    ohhhh... Stop Using A Dishwasher !!!! that will be a great saver :)

    so at the moment how are you doing your cooking and refridgeration ? are they mains powered ?
    They are 2 of the big power consumers after hot water ( which you already have covered)
    The prob with going totally off grid is being able to produce enough power for those 2 items. Maybe you can/alread do use the fireplace system for cooking ? That would be a major power saver :)

    Dave
     
  14. twister

    twister

    172
    7
    Feb 12, 2012
    Going totally off grid is not a good idea. You will have to spend a lot of money buying batteries, and believe me, you will spend a lot of time maintaining those batteries. Don't ask me how I know! Solar power with a grid tie is the way to go. When you are not using power the meter turns backwards and when you do need power for something like a motor, you will have it.
     
  15. jackorocko

    jackorocko

    1,284
    1
    Apr 4, 2010

    You need to be careful about this though. I had some people question me over something like solar power. Needless to say where I live, you would barely pay back the initial cost of a solar system before you died. I say that because the sun's power is not the same in all places on this earth. I live in Pa and it is one of the worst places in the country (USA) for solar energy. Add to that constant cleaning of the panels and corrosive damage from the harsh winters.

    Personally I think wind power is far superior to solar. When you use the most power in your house the wind will be at its strongest outside. Just the opposite for the sun (unless you need AC, which would go against everything in being GREEN.)

    Nothing against going green, but if you decide to do it, do your research. It could be more costly then you could ever have imagined.
     
  16. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,477
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    Jan 21, 2010
    Come visit me the next time you're in Australia!

    What's best depends a lot on where you live.
     
  17. jackorocko

    jackorocko

    1,284
    1
    Apr 4, 2010
    totally agree, but I hate cleaning windows. Can't see myself ever cleaning my solar panels with the amount of dirt you find in most rural areas.
     
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