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hum suppressor guitar pedal -- scam or legit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by dietermoreno, Apr 30, 2013.

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  1. dietermoreno

    dietermoreno

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    Dec 30, 2012
    Hum suppressor guitar pedal -- scam or legit.

    A guitarist told me that he uses a hum supressor guitar pedal that really makes his tone "to remove all of that **** hum".

    I have seen these sold at Guitar Center and Sam Ash for over $100.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the only schematic I could find in Google image search: [​IMG]

    How do these work? Are these a combination of several active notch filters, with an active notch filter for every even multiple of 60 Hz (in the U.S.) up to say 1200 Hz?


    If a guitarist really wanted to have a clean sound, why doesn't he just use baluns to allow him to use an XLR cable to connect his guitar to his guitar amp?

    I've read that for a short time in the 60's, XLR was considered for guitar, and everyone hated it because it sounded too clean.

    XLR would be a much simpler (and cheaper) solution than several active notch filters (if that is indeed how such "hum supressors" work).


    Is this often the case when someone is trying to sell you some fancy electronics machine to remove hum, it is a scam and the only real way to remove hum is to use a balanced line and or ferrite ring shielding?
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2013
  2. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    The circuit you show is just to clean up a bad power supply. The device you show is likely a 60Hz notch filter.

    Bob
     
  3. dietermoreno

    dietermoreno

    238
    0
    Dec 30, 2012
    So it does something like this then:

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Yoa01

    Yoa01

    214
    0
    Jun 18, 2012
    The first circuit you posted is simply to clean up the power to each pedal, not anything like a hum suppressor pedal. Most hum suppressors are like gaters; they have a set volume threshold which determines when the volume is totally cut on the output of the pedal.

    Really good ones actually remove noise from the signal, but are usually digital because they need a sample of the noise to remove, then they actively remove it.
     
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