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HP-8444A (WTB)

Discussion in 'Electronic Equipment' started by RST Engineering \(jw\), Jun 26, 2007.

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  1. Does anybody on the ng have, or know where there is, a working HP-8444(A)
    Tracking Generator that somebody is willing to swap for paper pictures of
    old dead presidents?

    Please don't tell me to try ebay. A lot of somebodys on that site have
    figured out just exactly how to game the system so that in the last 15
    seconds of a listing the bids from somebody who hadn't made a bid in the
    last seven days magically winds up with the unit for 50 cents more than
    those of us who have played the game fair for a week.

    No, I'm not interested in knowing how to game the system.

    Jim

    --
    "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in
    a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside,
    thoroughly used up, totally worn out, with chocolate in one hand and wine in
    the other, loudly proclaiming 'WOO HOO What a Ride!'"
    --Unknown
     
  2. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    guess you don't want to pay much?
    my first hit found one for $275
     
  3. Are you paying your ISP by the character? Then what "hit" and where? $275
    is a BIT high, but if mint and guaranteed to work when it gets here not all
    that bad.

    Please, don't be cryptic in your responses.

    Jim

    --
    "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in
    a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside,
    thoroughly used up, totally worn out, with chocolate in one hand and wine in
    the other, loudly proclaiming 'WOO HOO What a Ride!'"
    --Unknown
     
  4. --
    "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in
    a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside,
    thoroughly used up, totally worn out, with chocolate in one hand and wine in
    the other, loudly proclaiming 'WOO HOO What a Ride!'"
    --Unknown

    The problem, Doug, is that there are bids in the last 15 to 30 seconds of an
    auction (especially for test equipment) from people who have never bid in
    the previous 7 days. And, in that final flurry of bidding, you will see the
    same new person bid three, four, or five times. I know that is part of the
    rules of the auction, but there doesn't seem to be any way to counteract it.

    At a normal eyeball auction, the auctioneer generally uses, "going once,
    going twice, SOLD to the feller with the goofy grin."
    Story of my young life. Dime short and a day late. Thanks for anything you
    can do.

    Jim
     
  5. doug

    doug Guest

    There is no gaming of the system. Highest bid wins whenever it is
    put in. The only difference in putting a bid in early is that if
    someone gets emotionally attached to the item they have time to
    think about it and increase their bid. This is why items that start
    out with very low bids end up selling at higher prices than those
    that have high initial bids.

    I just bid what I am willing to pay and leave it at that. The unhappy
    people are those who expect to get something cheap and are disappointed
    when they don't.

    That said, I did have a few 8444A generators around. I will look and
    see if I still do. I got rid of a truckload of this stuff a few months
    ago.
     
  6. Yes there is. There's a game to be played with *every* system. It's just
    that eBay has a _different_ system to the traditional "auction" where a number
    of people stand around the auctioneer and bid for an item.
    That's a very simplistic rule that applies to everything, in other words, it
    doesn't actually help us in this eBay instance.
    People who fully take advantage of the eBay "system", know that whatever
    anyone bids before the last five seconds is completely irrelevant. (Or less
    than the relevant final price anyway).

    The only exception I've seen is in the stupid auctions where someone
    auctions off their virginity, or a party with someone or something equally
    intangible as that. In that case, the stream of stored bids exceeding $100k
    (or millions) says something important about the item. The vast majority
    think it's stupid.
    The way to do it, is to keep some sort of accurate timepiece (really
    accurate), syncronise the clock, and place a bid that is as high as you're
    willing to go. Press the OK button in the last five seconds.

    If you win you win, if you don't you don't. And that's as far as it goes.

    The only way you're guaranteed to get something cheaper is to work out if a
    'buy it now' plus freight is cheaper than buying it locally off the shelf.

    Past that, it's all odds, and if you play the game well, you certainly can
    average quite a fair bit cheaper and make (some) money. You just have to be
    flexible on when, how much, and most importantly, _what_ crap you're buying
    and selling.

    So in this instance, I agree with the OP statement. He was after a specific
    (now obsolete) instrument, and wasn't willing to fudge around with the idiots
    on eBay to get one. I can't blame him.
     
  7. Don Bowey

    Don Bowey Guest

    IIRC eBay sells software to do what you describe. That way you do not need
    to lurk at the end of an auction. I don't know what happens if two or more
    guys do it.

    ebay appears to me to have no ethics in this area and others.

    Don
     
  8. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Ebay's ethics are not the issue, it's the people that use this
    bid-at-the-last-possible-moment software that are slimy (imho).

    Bob
     
  9. Tom Bruhns

    Tom Bruhns Guest

    I have an HP8444A, serial 1215A00303, that I'd be willing to part
    with. I'd have to figure out how to adequately test it before sending
    it anywhere though.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  10. Don Bowey

    Don Bowey Guest

    ebay's ethics *are* an issue as it is they who make available for a fee, the
    software to give some buyers an edge over those who do not buy the software.

    As to the lurkers who put in increased maximum bid mounts manually at the
    end........ That's life.

    Don
     
  11. Tom...

    I have no idea where you live, but if you are in Northern California, I can
    pack up the 141T spectrum analyzer system and pack it over to your place for
    testing.

    Jim
     
  12. Joel Kolstad

    Joel Kolstad Guest

    I don't believe that eBay themselves sells any such "snipping" software.
    However, they do have an API available that programs can use to place
    listings, make bids, etc... This of course has plenty of legitimate uses but
    it makes snipping much easier to implement as well.

    I'm not sure there's any good technical solution to this problem. Some people
    have suggested changing the auction format to one similar to those found in
    real life, where a new bid extends the auction until no more new bids come in,
    but I certainly understand why people don't like that approach either.

    ---Joel
     
  13. JeffM

    JeffM Guest

  14. Tom Bruhns

    Tom Bruhns Guest

    Far Northern California, up across the Columbia river. There's a good
    chance that there's an HP141T closer than California. Far easier for
    me would be to test it parametrically: supply inputs from signal
    generators and look at the output on a spectrum analyzer. It's not
    all that complicated inside, at least from a block-diagram
    perspective, and it should be obvious if any of the modules is not
    working correctly.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
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