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How to reconnect this tiny cable?

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by Raigon, Jul 13, 2017.

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  1. Raigon

    Raigon

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    Jun 24, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2017
  2. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    Remove a short strip of the insulation.
    Wet the cable end with solder.
    Solder the cable to the connector.
    Possibly put some hot glue on top of the solder joint to get a form of strain relief (not really a good one, but better than nothing).
     
    Raigon likes this.
  3. Raigon

    Raigon

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    Jun 24, 2017
    Hello sir, first of all thank you for your effort.

    Okay, my question is would a 60w soldering iron be okay at doing this? The only solder I have is 60/40 Rosin core would this be enough? Any tips at stripping (I don't have any specific tool to do this) the insulation? When soldering I should heat the wire not the solder right?

    Please, excuse my ignorance. Thank you!
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2017
  4. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    A 60W iron is rather on the large side however it will work.

    Try applying the iron to the very end of the wire - touch only the exposed wire and not the plastic.

    You may find that the insulation shrinks back enough to expose enough of the wire core to apply solder and remake the joint.

    Personally I would desolder BOTH wires and cut the insulation back so the ends are equal lengths but that is really being 'pedantic' of me!
     
    Raigon and davenn like this.
  5. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    It's not so much the power of the soldering iron as the size of teh tip. A fine tip on a 60 W iron will work better than a coarse tip on a 20 W iron.
    The 60/40 solder is o.k.

    Stripping by heating the wire will often work, but I do not recommend it. The melting plastic emits hazardous gases and if the insulation is (as vommonly the case) made from pvc, hydrochloric acid can be created which in the long term will corrode the metal and your joint will break again.
    You can easily strip teh insulation using a pocket knife or a wire cutter. Just be careful not to cut the wire core.
     
    Raigon likes this.
  6. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    With all due respect, isn't that a bit over-the-top for such a situation?

    Maybe if the OP was wiring up a satellite for earth orbit or for decades in deep space I'd concede the point but for everyday simple repairs it amounts to (almost) scaremongering!???
     
  7. Raigon

    Raigon

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    Jun 24, 2017
    Hello!

    Bad news, I accidentally melted this thing's hanging wire outside: https://ibb.co/iXXcHv

    Stripping the wires was easy, but soldering this tiny thing isn't. Is there anything I can do? I'm thinking if is it okay just to plug the red & black wires into it?
     
  8. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Those connectors are usually made by CRIMPING the wire to the pin. The pin itself is held in the holder by a small (VERY small) 'tang' that, if located and pressed, will allow the pin to slide out of the holder - at which point you 'may' have a chance to solder the wire to it.
     
  9. tedstruk

    tedstruk

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    Jan 7, 2012
    never use anything over 30w on electronics. 15w is suggested for board work. and get some regular electronics solder.. for electronics.

    To repair a wire connection---
    1.you strip the insulation to bare the wire.
    2.you apply solder paste to the wire...
    3.then put a drop of solder on your solder gun tip...
    4.then you touch the wire to the solder gun tip..
    5.and the solder miraculously coats the wire...

    6.Then hold the tinned wire to the joint,
    7.and touch the tip of the solder gun to the joint,
    8.hold it just long enough to melt the solder.
    9.and keep holding it until you fingers burn like hell......
    10.then slowly ask yourself what the f*** you got into this massachistic hobby for as you release the hardened joint...
     
  10. Raigon

    Raigon

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    Jun 24, 2017
    Uhm...So I need a crimping tool right?

    Can't I just plug the red and black cable in the hole of that connector and glue gun it? :(
     
  11. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    You can, but the connection will not be reliable.
    Soldering with a low power iron with a fine tip is better. Or use pliers to press-fit the wire into the pin. This is not as strong as real crimping, but better than hot glue.

    It's a matter of occupational safety. For a one-off repair it may be acceptable. Being repeatedly subjected to these gases is not good, neither for your health nor for the solder joints or the tip of the soldering iron.
     
  12. Raigon

    Raigon

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    Jun 24, 2017

    Sir, do you know what that connector is? I think I just need to buy a new one, because when I attempted to solder it, some solder got stuck inside of the hole.
     
  13. Harald Kapp

    Harald Kapp Moderator Moderator

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    Nov 17, 2011
    I'm sorry, I cannot help you here :(
     
  14. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Is the connector absolutely necessary?

    If the item is intended for repeated dismantling then sure, fit a new connector but if this is a one-off repair that is unlikely to ever be dismantled again then just eliminate the connector and hardwire (solder) the wires where they are needed.

    Such connectors are only used in OEM to simplify manufacture (remove any manual skills required to assemble it) but if you're just repairing something then there is no absolute requirement to fit a replacement.
     
  15. Raigon

    Raigon

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    Jun 24, 2017
    It's okay sir, I am more than grateful for your efforts. :)
     
  16. Raigon

    Raigon

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    Jun 24, 2017
    Yes, I think so. Because there's an outlet that doesn't allow (it's covered) me to solder it. Its from the laptop, the one that's responsible for powering it up.
     
  17. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    Jun 25, 2014
    I don't know the size of that connector you have... 1mm, 1.25mm, etc.
    I thought it might be a small jst or Molex pico blade connector, but am unsure on the size.

    If you have the drive to attempt this... get something to hold your connector, and attempt to take it apart with a pair of pins/needles.
    There is a little plastic tab that can be lifted that will allow the metal piece inside to be removed. If you lift the tab, you may be able to push the metal piece out from the end that mates with the connector.

    If you manage to get this out, you can solder the wire on it and slide it back in.
    You may also be able to try 'wire glue' or conductive adhesive. Take care not to short the connector with the glue though. This way you could just dab a little glue on the wire and slide it back into the connector.
     
  18. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    You could still solder wire straight onto the board and use 'any' connector to make a removable connection. board ----wire---- (two pin plug socket of your choice) ----wire----where ever it goes!
     
    Gryd3 likes this.
  19. Raigon

    Raigon

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    Jun 24, 2017
    Hey guys, I've managed to remove some of its roof.

    I don't have any, fine tip atm. Can I just heat a tiny screwdriver and use it as a soldering iron? :(

    https://ibb.co/gX6WUa
     
  20. kellys_eye

    kellys_eye

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    Jun 25, 2010
    Probably not. You need a 'mass' of heat and a screwdriver tip will probably cool to the point of useless almost immediately you remove it from the heat source.

    No harm in trying though....
     
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