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How to: power this old ringer?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Pharaday, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. Pharaday

    Pharaday

    62
    2
    Jan 18, 2016
    How do I make this ring? Inside the bell is alot like my old doorbell. It has copper coil that drives a ringer (ya know, with electromagnets/opposite poles, that thing) which moves horizontally and strikes both sides of the bell. I just wanna give it a battery and a switch amd make het ring . Hang on, trying to post the picture...
     
  2. Pharaday

    Pharaday

    62
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    Jan 18, 2016
    For some reason, I kept getting an error when trying to upload a pic to the forum

    Because it was WAY too big, you need to resize before uploading to a max of 1024 x 768
    and preferably smaller 800x600
    here is the pic, now inline


    Clipboard01.jpg

    [Mod Edit added pic and comment]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2019
  3. Pharaday

    Pharaday

    62
    2
    Jan 18, 2016
    Give it power through the 2 yellow wired coming out of the bell itself? May I assume that the wire on the switch is negative? Well, I tried giving it 9V, no ring... something to do with... the phone signal?
     
  4. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    The ringer signal is AC on a phone. There is thus no negative.
    Your picture blanks out after a second or so thus I cannot see the circuit. Are there pionts to actuate the coil?
     
  5. Pharaday

    Pharaday

    62
    2
    Jan 18, 2016
    I would imagine those yellow wires come out would be the only way to activate that coil. Here are 3 pics. All with the metal part of the bell taken off. One showing the topside of the bell mechanism, one showing the bottom of the bell mechanism and s close up if that switch. the switch has 4 wires. red and green from the telephone line, black from the battery and one of the two yellow wires coming out of the bell
    mechanism.
    https://imgur.com/a/jP3BMmG
    https://imgur.com/a/crieCUS
    https://imgur.com/a/UEAR52x
     
  6. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,315
    1,766
    Sep 5, 2009

    As @duke37 said, it's a phone bell

    The old phone bells rang on 75VAC

    @Pharaday ... please note what I said about images in your edited second post
     
  7. Pharaday

    Pharaday

    62
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    Jan 18, 2016
    ok. go on....
     
  8. Pharaday

    Pharaday

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    2
    Jan 18, 2016
    And I make it ring by.....

    lol jk so its that outdated huh. well thanks guys
     
  9. Ylli

    Ylli

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    Jun 19, 2018
    60 - 90 VAC, 20 Hz in the US.
     
  10. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    586
    Sep 24, 2016
    In Canada and United States an old phone ringer worked on 90V at 20Hz. It probably would not work at the 60Hz of electricity.
    An original Bell Telephone used two gongs. Each gong was hit 20 times each second and played different frequencies (440Hz and 480Hz).
    Your ringer has only one gong so it would sound completely different to an old original Bell Telephone.
     
  11. Pharaday

    Pharaday

    62
    2
    Jan 18, 2016
    ok I see what you're saying. I need to connect a bunch of resistors in series and plug them into my outlet so I can get 75V. Just jam em in there, right?
     
  12. AnalogKid

    AnalogKid

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    Jun 10, 2015
    Traditionally, a phone bell needs around 70 to 90 Vac, at around 20 to 30 Hz. But to see if is even functional, use a transformer with a 24 to 48 Vac secondary. The armature won't be happy trying to move that fast, but you should get something out.

    ak
     
  13. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,315
    1,766
    Sep 5, 2009

    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

    please don't do that ….

    A bunch of resistors give no isolation/protection from the mains
    did you not notice people said ~ 20-30 Hz ?


     
  14. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    Sep 24, 2016
    The old ringers needed to work miles away from a telephone switching center using very thin wires, and there might be two or three phones in a house in parallel, so their ringing currents needed to be very low. So they were designed to resonate mechanically at 20Hz then a very low current would cause then to swing back and forth at 20Hz. The armature hammer hit one gong when it moved one way then it hit the other gong when it moved the other way. Your bell dont doo dat.
     
  15. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,315
    1,766
    Sep 5, 2009

    yeah, it's just a single gong, no problem with that
     
  16. Audioguru

    Audioguru

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    Sep 24, 2016
    Sorry, before I was wrong. The two mechanical gongs on an old Bell telephone were 1280Hz and 1610Hz. The ringtone heard on the caller's phone was 440Hz and 480Hz.
    The single ringer gong will sound like a door bell, the alternating 1280Hz and 1610Hz musical chord produced by the two gongs in an old telephone will sound like an old telephone.
     
    davenn likes this.
  17. Pharaday

    Pharaday

    62
    2
    Jan 18, 2016
    Oh BTW, update:
    The ringer worked (overtime) on 120v from the wall. I turned the ringer down as low as it could go...
    It didn't care about polarity, just shove a + and - wire in there somewhere. No, that's not a pot I'm using as an on switch, just on/off. Note the nostalgia production is through the roof.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2019
  18. Pharaday

    Pharaday

    62
    2
    Jan 18, 2016
    Also, a barely working 12v electric motor works GREAT on 24v
     
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