Connect with us

How to power an induction hob coil

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Aiddyjay, Jul 1, 2015.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Aiddyjay

    Aiddyjay

    5
    0
    Jul 1, 2015
    I'm working on a project for an idea I have but due to lack electrical knowledge I'm having trouble. Can someone tell me the easiest way to directly power an Induction coil (from a cooker) at a low voltage? I have dismantled a stand alone cooker for my project but even on the lowest setting it's too powerful for my needs. Can anyone help?
    Many thanks
     
  2. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,164
    1,080
    Dec 18, 2013
    Hello and welcome to EP
    Can you tell us a bit more about your project. How powerful do you need it, what's it doing?
    Thanks
    Adam
     
  3. Aiddyjay

    Aiddyjay

    5
    0
    Jul 1, 2015
    Hi, thanks for your reply. Sorry this all maybe a bit vague as I've got what I need in my head but not the knowledge to do it! I essentially need to use the coil to warm up a thin sheet of steel to about 50 degrees C through about 1/4inch of plastic. On its current lowest setting it's up to about 80-90 degrees C, way to hot for my needs. Also I could do with powering the coil without all the extras on the cooker ie: control panel, timers etc..
     
  4. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,164
    1,080
    Dec 18, 2013
    Does the plate need to be steel? Can you increase the thickness of the plastic? Can you also take some pictures of the HOB circuitry so we can have a look.
    Adam
     
  5. Minder

    Minder

    2,953
    623
    Apr 24, 2015
    Did you try the spacer/stand off method to reduce the inductive field range.
    You may have to get a schematic of the cooker in order to modify it, sometimes this is attached at the back etc.
    M.
     
  6. Aiddyjay

    Aiddyjay

    5
    0
    Jul 1, 2015
    I can increase the thickness of the plastic if needed but moving the sheet of steel away from the coil it cannot detect it's presence and does not turn on.
     
  7. Minder

    Minder

    2,953
    623
    Apr 24, 2015
    How about the thickness of steel, can it be reduced?
    M.
     
  8. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,164
    1,080
    Dec 18, 2013
    You may not need to move it very far. Does it need to be solid steel? What about a material change? What about a small heat sink? Have you thought of drilling some holes in the material?
    Adam
     
  9. Minder

    Minder

    2,953
    623
    Apr 24, 2015
    Also you could experiment to try seeing what the minimum amount of ferrous material (steel) could be used to enable the stove turn on?
    M.
     
  10. Aiddyjay

    Aiddyjay

    5
    0
    Jul 1, 2015
    Would thinner steel get hotter/quicker? I could try putting holes in it. Can't go thicker steel as it needs to be as light as possible. I can use less steel to the point it still turns on but the steel will still reach a too hot temperature.
     
  11. Minder

    Minder

    2,953
    623
    Apr 24, 2015
    Maybe arrange some kind of cycling timer, if the lowest heat is too high?
    Varying on/off times may be the answer if it is possible.
    M.
     
  12. Aiddyjay

    Aiddyjay

    5
    0
    Jul 1, 2015
    Maybe a timer option could be the answer. I'm assuming I cannot connect an adjustable voltage ac transformer direct to the coil?
     
  13. Minder

    Minder

    2,953
    623
    Apr 24, 2015
    I think you would run into detection issues still.
    Unless the detection were disabled.
    M.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-